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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

Health Medical Pharma Reference Libraries

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Trichinella spiralis
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Trichinella spiralis, sometimes known as the pork worm, is a parasite within the Nematoda class. It can be found in pigs, rats, humans, and bears. This worm causes trichinosis in humans, most often from consuming undercooked pork. This species is the smallest within its class, reaching an average body length of .16 centimeters. Females are twice as large as males, displaying a sexual...

Eye-worm Loa loa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The eye-worm (Loa loa) is a species of roundworm within the Nematoda phylum. It can be found in India and Africa, among other areas. This species causes a disease known as Loa loa filariasis and is one of three species that can cause subcutaneous filariasis in humans. Females are larger than males, reaching an average body length of up to 2.7 inches, with males reaching an average body length...

Common Liver Fluke Fasciola hepatica
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The common liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica), also known as the sheep liver fluke, is a parasitic flatworm in the Trematoda class. This species can infect sheep, cattle, humans, and other animals across the world. This species is one of the largest of its kind, reaching an average body length of 1.1 inches, with a width of up to .5 inches. This species is shaped like a worm and is typically wider...

New World Hookworm Necator americanus
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The New World hookworm (Necator americanus) is a hookworm that can be found in the New World. This species, along with other species in the Nematode phylum, is a parasitic worm that is commonly found in cats, dogs, and humans. Infections from this species are known as Necatoriasis. However, there are two common species of hookworm that infest humans, known as the Old World hookworm (Ancylostoma...

Muscle
2013-04-30 14:32:22

Muscle is soft tissue that is filled with protein filaments that manipulates the shape of a cell which can help with posture, movement and functions of other organs in the body such as the lungs and heart as well as the digestive tract. Formation and Orientation There are three different types of muscle tissues; skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscles. Skeletal muscle is used to hold...

Liver
2013-04-30 14:18:06

The liver is the organ in charge of processing, neutralizing and excreting certain secretions for the metabolic processes. Formation and Orientation The liver is considered to be both the largest internal organ and the largest gland in the human body. It is situated just below the diaphragm, to the right of the stomach and on top of the gallbladder. There are two ways blood can travel to...

Large Intestine
2013-04-30 14:11:04

The large intestine is the organ that follows the small intestine but is the last part of the digestive tract before the waste leaves the body. Formation and Orientation The small intestine is on average about five feet long. It is composed of four distinct structural parts; the cecum, colon, and anus. The cecum is the part of the large intestine that comes first. It is separated into...

Kidney
2013-04-30 13:58:54

Kidneys are the organs in the body that regulate blood pressure, electrolytes, acid-base homeostasis and other homeostatic functions. Formation and Orientation Kidneys can be found in the abdominal cavity, one on each side of the spine in the retroperitoneum, located at the back of the abdominal cavity. Kidneys are usually 11 to 14 centimeters long, six centimeters wide and four...

Tracheal Intubation
2013-04-30 13:26:36

Tracheal intubation (commonly known as intubation) is the placement of a flexible plastic tube into the trachea in order to maintain an open airway or to serve as a conduit through which to administer oxygen or other drugs. It is commonly performed in emergency situations and critically ill or injured patients, but intubation is also used in patients who will be undergoing a lengthy surgery...

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
2013-04-30 13:21:44

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, commonly known as CPR, is an emergency procedure performed in an effort to preserve brain function and manually pump blood through to the body’s vital organs, until further measures are taken to restore spontaneous circulation. CPR is indicated in cardiac arrest patients, but may also be performed on patients with an unresponsive presentation or those...