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Latest Hedgehog signaling pathway Stories

2011-04-13 21:05:19

NYU School of Medicine researchers find molecules block a crucial cell pathway Researchers from the Cancer Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center have identified three novel small molecules that interrupt a crucial cellular communication pathway that regulates many aspects of development and cancer. The finding, published in the April 12, 2011 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and featured on its cover, could provide the basis for innovative therapies for...

2011-04-04 14:00:00

ORLANDO, Fla., April 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced results today from two preclinical studies of molecules that target genetic mutations and disable specific signaling pathways that can lead to cancer. The studies evaluated two unique molecules - a JAK2 inhibitor and a Hedgehog inhibitor - with results presented during the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 102nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla. Signaling pathways within cells regulate...

2011-04-03 15:49:29

A new hedgehog pathway inhibitor demonstrated efficacy in preventing and treating basal cell cancer among patients with basal cell nevus syndrome, a rare inheritable disease, according to Phase II data presented at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011, held April 2-6. In 1996, Ervin Epstein Jr., M.D., senior scientist at Children's Hospital of Oakland Research Institute, and colleagues identified the site of the mutation that causes basal cell nevus syndrome: the PTCH gene, which encodes a...

2011-02-28 22:12:37

A pediatric brain tumor that causes gruesome suffering is finally yielding its secrets. For the first time, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have cultured human cells from this cancer, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, and used those cells to create an animal model of the disease. Their discoveries will facilitate research on new treatments for DIPG, a tumor of school-aged children that is now almost universally fatal. The advances come thanks to the parents of young...

2011-01-10 15:07:49

Common genetic recipes pattern organs as different as shark gills and human hands A SCUBA expedition in Australia and New Zealand to find the rare embryos of an unusual shark cousin enabled American and British researchers to confirm new developmental similarities between fish and mammals. Elephant fish, a relative of sharks, utilize the same genetic process for forming skeletal gill covers that lizards and mammals use to form fingers and toes, researchers at the University of Chicago and the...

2010-12-23 02:10:08

The drug is already FDA-approved for one kind of cancer. Researchers say immediate clinical applications to treat other cancers is possible Researchers at the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, a part of Georgetown University Medical Center, have found that an arsenic-based agent already FDA-approved for a type of leukemia may be helpful in another hard-to-treat cancer, Ewing's Sarcoma (ES). The research, based on animal studies, also suggests the drug might be beneficial in...

2010-12-17 13:02:35

Comprehensive study of medulloblastoma suggests targeted drugs may be especially effective in children Pediatric cancer researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia contributed important expertise to a new landmark study of medulloblastoma, a type of brain tumor typically found in children. The large multicenter study defines the genetic landscape of this cancer, and holds intriguing clues to gene changes on signaling pathways that may become fruitful targets for future therapies....

2010-12-08 22:14:33

International effort led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists is expected to fuel development of targeted therapies and aid the search for unique combinations of cells and mutations that lead to other cancers Investigators have demonstrated for the first time that the most common malignant childhood brain tumor, medulloblastoma, is actually several different diseases, each arising from distinct cells destined to become different structures. The breakthrough is expected to...

2010-07-13 02:30:11

Miss Marple notwithstanding, arsenic might not be many people's favorite chemical. But the notorious poison does have some medical applications. Specifically, a form called arsenic trioxide has been used as a therapy for a particular type of leukemia for more than 10 years. Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that it may be useful in treating a variety of other cancers. Combining arsenic with other therapies may give doctors a two-pronged approach to...

2010-06-25 13:25:23

Nearly all mammalian cells have what's called a primary cilium "” a single, stump-like rod projecting from the smooth contours of the cell's outer membrane. Unlike its more flamboyant cousins, the motile cilia, which beat industriously in packs to clear our airways of mucous or to shuttle a fertilized egg to the uterus, the primary cilium just "¦ sits there. Like a bump on a log. In fact, it looks so useless that, until recently, many scientists considered it to be just a...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'