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Latest HeLa Stories

2014-07-16 12:39:43

Johns Hopkins Medicine Process suggests a new type of immunotherapy A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients' own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say. A description of the work will be published July 15 in the journal Science Signaling. "Our goal is to build artificial cells...

2013-08-08 13:57:33

A team from the University of Washington has unveiled a comprehensive portrait of the genome of the world’s first immortal cell line, known as HeLa. The cell line was derived in 1951 from an aggressive cervical cancer that killed Henrietta Lacks, a 31-year-old African-American tobacco farmer and mother of five – the subject of the 2010 New York Times best-seller, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” They will also be...

2013-08-08 10:14:45

The National Institutes of Health today announced in Nature that it has reached an understanding with the family of the late Henrietta Lacks to allow biomedical researchers controlled access to the whole genome data of cells derived from her tumor, commonly known as HeLa cells. These cells have already been used extensively in scientific research and have helped make possible some of the most important medical advances of the past 60 years. These include the development of modern vaccines,...

2011-09-01 16:59:02

Biological computer destroys cancer cells Researchers led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson and MIT professor Ron Weiss have successfully incorporated a diagnostic biological "computer" network in human cells. This network recognizes certain cancer cells using logic combinations of five cancer-specific molecular factors, triggering cancer cells destruction. Yaakov (Kobi) Benenson, Professor of Synthetic Biology at ETH Zurich, has spent a large part of his career developing biological...

2011-07-26 22:15:16

Cancer patients may view their tumors as parasites taking over their bodies, but this is more than a metaphor for Peter Duesberg, a molecular and cell biology professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Cancerous tumors are parasitic organisms, he said. Each one is a new species that, like most parasites, depends on its host for food, but otherwise operates independently and often to the detriment of its host. In a paper published in the July 1 issue of the journal Cell Cycle,...

2011-03-18 09:00:00

CHEVY CHASE, Md., March 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Hela Salon and Spa at The Collection will launch its refurbished webpage exclusively for the Chevy Chase location. The site www.helasalonspa.com, will come equipped with the following: Detailed service descriptions and pricing Staff Bios Photo Gallery/ Staff Portfolios Events Specials Social Media Careers Contact (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110317/PH66629LOGO ) "The new site...

2011-03-03 23:27:38

Discovery of molecular mechanism reveals antitumor possibilities Researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have discovered that a natural product isolated from a traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as thunder god vine, or lei gong teng, and used for hundreds of years to treat many conditions including rheumatoid arthritis works by blocking gene control machinery in the cell. The report, published as a cover story of the March issue of Nature Chemical Biology, suggests...

2010-11-03 00:00:41

Authors to speak at Sweet Briar College Thursday, Nov. 4 and Monday, Nov. 8. Sweet Briar, VA (Vocus) November 2, 2010 Sweet Briar College will host lectures and book signings by two noted women journalists on Thursday, Nov. 4 and Monday, Nov. 8. Although they have different stories to tell, each addresses events that affect our lives in significant ways. Amanda Little is an award-winning environmental journalist who set out to explain the nation's energy crisis "” how we got in it and...

2009-07-30 11:44:13

In cancer research, as in most other biomedical sciences, they are playing a key role: living cells, kept in sterile plastic containers with red culture media populating incubators in laboratories around the world. But do researchers always know what is really living in their culture dishes? Under the microscope, different cell lines are almost impossible to distinguish from each other. When these important research objects stop growing without apparent reason "“ is it because of the...

2008-09-16 18:00:11

To: NATIONAL EDITORS Contact: Carrie Strehlau, St. Jude Public Relations, +1-901-595- 2295, carrie.strehlau@stjude.org; or Summer Freeman, St. Jude Public Relations, +1-901-595-3061, summer.freeman@stjude.org Study shows treatment with a newly discovered drug could be useful in sensitizing tumor cells to therapeutic irradiation and potentially some chemotherapies MEMPHIS, Tenn., Sept. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/-- Scientists at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital have shown that it...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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