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Latest Heliconius Stories

2014-03-03 23:25:07

12,000 Exotic Butterflies, 100 species on display from March 1, 2014 - April 6, 2014 Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) March 03, 2014 The Fort Worth Botanic Garden, the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT®), the Fort Worth Garden Club, the Fort Worth Botanical Society, and Cirro Energy are pleased to announce the opening of “Butterflies in the Garden,” the largest exhibit of live, exotic butterflies in north central Texas in the conservatory of the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, 3220...

World's First Butterfly Bacteria Sequenced
2014-01-30 14:24:03

University of Colorado at Boulder For the first time ever, a team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has sequenced the internal bacterial makeup of the three major life stages of a butterfly species, a project that showed some surprising events occur during metamorphosis. The team, led by CU-Boulder doctoral student Tobin Hammer, used powerful DNA sequencing methods to characterize bacterial communities inhabiting caterpillars, pupae and adults of Heliconius erato, commonly known...

Butterflies Offer Insights Into Evolution
2013-10-31 16:39:31

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the University of Chicago finds it’s genetically easier to spin off into a new species than it may have once been thought, even if the two species remain close and interbreed with one another. After studying butterflies, the researchers found evolution can happen as the result of a process rather than a single event. In fact, in the case of butterflies, the beginning of a new species could begin with something as...

Researchers Find That Some Butterflies Share DNA
2012-05-17 10:44:55

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com Geneticists have made a startling breakthrough while sequencing the genome of a South American butterfly, according to a study published in the May 16 edition of Nature. More than 70 scientists from 9 different institutions were involved in the Heliconius Genome Consortium, which sequenced the entire genome of the Postman butterfly (Heliconius melpomene). They found that the insect and two other related species, Heliconius timareta and Heliconius elevatus,...

Predators Drive Evolution Of Poison Dart Frogs' Skin Patterns
2011-11-22 04:10:01

Natural selection has played a role in the development of the many skins patterns of the tiny Ranitomeya imitator poison dart frog, according to a study that will be published in an upcoming edition of American Naturalist by University of Montreal biologist Mathieu Chouteau. The researcher's methodology was rather unusual: on three occasions over three days, at two different sites, Chouteau investigated the number of attacks that had been made on fake frogs, by counting how many times that...

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2011-08-15 07:09:20

The mystery of how a butterfly has changed its wing patterns to mimic neighboring species and avoid being eaten by birds has been solved by a team of European scientists. The study was published August 14, 2011 in the journal Nature. The greatest evolutionary thinkers, including Wallace, Bates and Darwin, have all wondered how butterflies that taste bad to birds have evolved the same patterns of warning coloration. Now for the first time, researchers led by the CNRS (Mus©um National...

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2011-07-25 06:45:00

Red may mean STOP or I LOVE YOU! A red splash on a toxic butterfly's wing screams DON'T EAT ME! In nature, one toxic butterfly species may mimic the wing pattern of another toxic species in the area. By using the same signal, they send a stronger message: DON'T EAT US! Now several research teams that include Smithsonian scientists in Panama, have discovered that Heliconius butterflies mimic each other's red wing patterns through changes in the same gene. Not only does this gene lead to the...

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2011-03-01 09:10:59

Observing a split in the butterfly family tree Larry Gilbert got hooked on observing butterflies when he was a just a kid. "I found a chrysalis of a black swallowtail in a lot near our house. I raised it in a Coke bottle in the window, and have been interested in butterflies ever since," says Gilbert, a professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas. In a rooftop greenhouse on the Austin campus, where he has worked since 1971, and as director of the 82-acre Brackenridge Field Lab...

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2010-02-16 15:17:28

Ability to identify own species aided by ultraviolet pigment Butterfly experts have suspected for more than 150 years that vision plays a key role in explaining wing color diversity. Now, for the first time, research led by UC Irvine biologists proves this theory true "“ at least in nine Heliconius species. Butterflies that have a duplicate gene allowing them to see ultraviolet colors also have UV-yellow pigment on their wings, reports the study by UCI's Adriana Briscoe, Seth Bybee and...

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2010-02-07 11:10:00

How two butterfly species have evolved exactly the same striking wing color and pattern has intrigued biologists since Darwin's day. Now, scientists at Cambridge have found "hotspots" in the butterflies' genes that they believe will explain one of the most extraordinary examples of mimicry in the natural world. Heliconius, or passion-vine butterflies, live in the Americas "“ from the southern United States to southern South America. Although they cannot interbreed, H. melpomene and H....


Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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