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International Science Team Solves Long-standing Mystery In Biology
2014-07-14 03:20:16

University of Leicester An international team of researchers, led by the University of Leicester, has solved a long-standing mystery in biology, by identifying the molecular structure of a vital biological chemical. The debate – which has raged within the scientific community for years – boils down to something as simple as a hydrogen atom: is it there, or is it not? The controversy centers around a form of enzyme called a heme (or haem, as in haemoglobin) at the center of which is...

2014-01-16 14:34:09

Novel biological mechanism relays electrons in proteins in mineral-breathing bacteria important for energy-related research Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. The results are key to understanding how the bacteria do chemistry in the ground, and will help researchers use them in microbial fuel cells, batteries, or for turning waste into electricity. Within the bacteria's...

2011-05-26 20:59:54

Researchers have discovered a tiny protein without which the soil and lab-dwelling worm C. elegans can't deliver iron-rich heme taken in from their diets to the rest of their bodies or to their developing embryos. The finding reported in the May 27th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, offers important insight into the transport of the essential ingredient in worms and other animals, including humans. Researchers say it also suggests a strategy for the development of drugs...

2011-05-26 20:58:20

Using a tiny bloodless worm, University of Maryland Associate Professor Iqbal Hamza and his team have discovered a large piece in the puzzle of how humans, and other organisms, safely move iron around in the body. The findings, published in the journal Cell, could lead to new methods for treating age-old scourges - parasitic worm infections, which affect more than a quarter of the world's population, and iron deficiency, the world's number one nutritional disorder. Using C. elegans, a common...

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2011-05-19 08:12:04

Salk scientists grow understanding of how photosynthesis is regulated The seeds sprouting in your spring garden may still be struggling to reach the sun. If so, they are consuming a finite energy pack contained within each seed. Once those resources are depleted, the plant cell nucleus must be ready to switch on a "green" photosynthetic program. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies recently showed a new way that those signals are relayed. In a study published in the May...

2011-01-30 23:59:00

AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands, January 31, 2011 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics (Euronext: AMT), a leader in the field of human gene therapy, announced today that the European Union (EU) has finalized a EUR 3.3 million grant to the AIPGENE consortium, of which AMT is a member, for the development of a gene therapy product for Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP). AIP is a severe and progressive disease caused by the inability of the body to produce the heme protein,...

2011-01-26 20:58:28

Princess Margaret Hospital researchers identify a key enzyme that affects radiation response in head and neck cancer patients Cancer researchers at Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) have discovered that targeting an enzyme called Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (UROD) can sensitize diseased tissue to radiation and chemotherapy, which could mean fewer side effects for individuals with head and neck cancer. The findings, published online today in Science Translational Medicine...

2010-09-30 14:49:12

Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia researchers find unusual suspect holds the secret for new approach to treat severe sepsis Severe sepsis, a disease characterised by a sudden drop in blood pressure and progressive organ dysfunction following infection, remains one of the most common causes of mortality in intensive care units worldwide. Even under the best possible medical conditions, mortality rates range between 30 and 70%. A research team from the Instituto Gulbenkian de...

2010-08-04 16:29:17

EMBL scientists identify proteins that ensure iron balance Most organisms need iron to survive, but too much iron is toxic, and can cause fatal organ failure. The same is true inside cells, where iron balance must also be maintained. In a study published today in Cell Metabolism, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have discovered that a group of proteins named IRPs ensure that this iron balance is kept and as such are essential for cell...

2010-04-02 12:24:59

Sideroblastic anemia is a form of anemia caused by an inability to incorporate iron into hemoglobin, something that is essential if the molecule is to perform its vital function of carrying oxygen from the lungs to the tissues. Recently, a patient with sideroblastic anemia was found to have a mutation in their GLRX5 gene that led to GLRX5 protein deficiency. Tracey Rouault and colleagues, at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, have now provided insight into...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'