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Latest Hemispatial neglect Stories

2013-01-16 10:39:04

Double special issue on aphasia, hemispatial neglect and related disorders published in Behavioural Neurology Approximately half a million individuals suffer strokes in the US each year, and about one in five develops some form of post-stroke aphasia, the partial or total loss of the ability to communicate. By comparing different types of aphasia, investigators have been able to gain new insights into the normal cognitive processes underlying language, as well as the potential response to...

2012-12-27 05:00:30

Researchers of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s Department of Rehabilitation Sciences have developed a novel treatment for people with hemiplegic arms because of stroke or unilateral cerebral palsy in order to speed up their recovery. Coined "Remind to move," the treatment requires the patients to wear a specially made sensory cueing wristwatch (SCW-V2), which is designed to provide pertinent sensory signals at a fixed interval. (PRWEB) December 26, 2012 Researchers of The...

2012-01-03 11:41:41

Collaborative stroke research study in January 2012 Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation shows bedside clinical evaluation can detect spatial neglect, a common disabling cognitive disorder that impedes recovery for 30 to 50% of stroke survivors. Researchers at Kessler Foundation and Seton Hall University report findings in the early diagnosis of acute spatial neglect, a hidden disability that is a common complication of stroke. In the weeks after stroke, 30-50% of stroke...

2011-12-16 08:51:25

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — The current treatment for strokes is attention and concentration training using computer and pencil-and-paper tasks. According to this study, transcranial magnetic stimulation, where a large electromagnetic coil is placed against the scalp, appears to be much more effective by creating currents that stimulate nerve cells. "The treatment is based on the theory that hemispatial neglect, a condition where one said of the body can´t function properly, results...

Magnetic Stimulation Treatment Could Help Stroke Patients
2011-12-15 13:59:16

New research suggests that using magnetic stimulation of the nerve cells in the brain of a stroke patent may help them recover faster. Hemispatial neglect is a condition in which a stroke patient is unable to see or recognize anything on the left side of their body. The condition is common after a stroke occurs on the right side of the brain.  Currently, doctors treat the condition through attention and concentration training using computer and pencil-and-paper tasks. A new...

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2009-12-28 09:25:00

Like a spotlight that illuminates an otherwise dark scene, attention brings to mind specific details of our environment while shutting others out. A new study by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies shows that the superior colliculus, a brain structure that primarily had been known for its role in the control of eye and head movements, is crucial for moving the mind's spotlight. Their findings, published in the Dec. 20, 2009, issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, add...

2009-04-30 08:00:00

Studies May Identify Best Candidates for Treatment of this Hidden Disability WEST ORANGE, N.J., April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Two studies from Kessler Foundation Research Center's Stroke Rehabilitation Research Laboratory were presented today at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 61st Annual Meeting held in Seattle, Washington, April 25 through May 2, 2009. The AAN Annual Meeting is the world's largest gathering of neuroscience professionals. (Photo:...

2009-01-14 08:53:44

Age at injury, type of injury, timing and specificity of treatment matterCognitive rehabilitation after a serious brain injury or stroke can help the mind in much the same way that physical therapy helps the body, according to a new meta-analysis. Because the data suggest that treatment may work best when tailored to age, injury, symptoms, and time since injury, the findings may help establish evidence-based treatment guidelines. A full report is in the January issue of Neuropsychology, which...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'