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Latest Hendrik Poinar Stories

Scientists Unlock Evolution Of Cholera And Identify The Strain Responsible For Early Pandemics
2014-01-09 12:57:03

McMaster University Working with a nearly 200-year-old sample of preserved intestine, researchers at McMaster University and the University of Sydney have traced the bacterium behind a global cholera pandemic that killed millions – a version of the same bug that continues to strike vulnerable populations in the world's poorest regions. Using sophisticated techniques, the team has mapped the entire genome of the elusive 19th century bacterium. The findings are significant because,...

Black Death Genome Could Reveal Secrets of Ancient And Modern Pathogens
2011-10-13 04:32:16

Scientists have successfully mapped the complete genome of the Black Death - the bubonic plague that wiped out 50 million Europeans between 1347 and 1351 and remains one of the most severe epidemics of all time - various news agencies reported on Wednesday. According to Kate Kelland of Reuters, an international team of researchers extracted and purified DNA from the remains from victims buried in the so-called plague pits of London. "Building on previous research which showed that a...

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2011-05-31 11:55:00

Researchers said that the woolly mammoth may have mated with a much larger elephant species. Woolly mammoths roamed the planet for over a million years, ranging from Europe to Asia to North America.  Nearly all these mammals vanished from Siberia about 10,000 years ago, although dwarf mammoths survived until 3,700 years ago. Although woolly mammoths lived in the cold of the tundra, the Columbia mammoth preferred the more temperate regions of southern and central North America. "We are...

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2008-11-19 17:05:00

Scientists are making remarkable strides in unraveling much of the genetic code of the ice age's wooly mammoth. The million-dollar project is an initial rough draft, detailing the mammoth's more than 3 billion DNA building blocks. The groundbreaking work even has some considering a future where certain extinct, prehistoric species might one day be resurrected. "It could be done. The question is, just because we might be able to do it one day, should we do it?" said Penn State biochemistry...

2008-09-04 15:47:05

Woolly mammoths' last stand before extinction in Siberia wasn't made by natives - rather, the beasts had American roots, researchers have discovered. Woolly mammoths once roamed the Earth for more than a half-million years, ranging from Europe to Asia to North America. These Ice Age giants vanished from mainland Siberia by 9,000 years ago, although mammoths survived on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean until roughly 3,700 years ago. "Scientists have always thought that because mammoths...

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2008-09-04 17:20:54

In the largest DNA study of the ancient wooly mammoths, Canadian scientists have discovered that the last Siberian wooly mammoths may actually have originated in North America. The study also raises questions about the role climate change may have played in the mammals' demise.  They believe the mammoths likely survived through the period when the ice sheets were at their largest, even as other Ice Age mammals were wiped out. The woolly mammoth, also known as Mammuthus primigenius,...

2005-12-22 22:21:54

A McMaster University geneticist, in collaboration with genome researchers from Penn State University and the American Museum of Natural History has made history by mapping a portion of the woolly mammoth's genome. The discovery, which has astounded the scientific world, surpasses an earlier study released today by Nature that also concerns the woolly mammoth. Hendrik Poinar, a molecular evolutionary geneticist in the department of anthropology and pathology at McMaster University, says his...


Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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