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Bones Found At Stonehenge Suggest It Was A Burial Ground
2013-03-10 06:12:59

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Theories about Stonehenge are nearly as old as the ancient monument itself and range from an astronomical calendar to an observatory of bygone days. Now, a team of researchers from the UK claim to have discovered evidence the stone structure started life as a massive burial ground. University College London (UCL) professor Mike Parker Pearson and colleagues unearthed over 50,000 cremated bone fragments belonging to 63 different...

New Evidence Links Stonehenge To Ancient Sun Worship
2011-11-29 05:42:53

Researchers have reportedly uncovered new evidence that supports the theory that Stonehenge had been used to worship the sun before the legendary stones were erected at the location. According to a report published online at the MyFoxHouston.com website Monday, representatives from the University of Birmingham and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection have confirmed that a team of experts representing both institutions had discovered a pair of large pits that were...

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2010-07-22 10:10:00

A team of archaeologists have uncovered a wooden version of Stonehenge approximately 6/10 of a mile from the monument's site, according to a Thursday University of Bingham press release. The second monument, which is believed to date back to the Neolithic period (2,000 to 4,000 years ago), was uncovered using virtual mapping technology. The discovery comes as part of a three-year, multimillion dollar study that started a mere two weeks ago. According to the university's press release, "The...

2009-08-13 14:44:25

Archaeologists say the oldest timber structure found yet in the London area was discovered during the excavation of a peat bog near Belmarsh Prison. Scientists from University College London's Institute of Archaeology said radiocarbon dating showed the timber platform, or trackway, to be nearly 6,000 years old, predating Stonehenge by more than 500 years. Archaeologists said the structure consisted of a timber platform found at a depth of about 14 feet near an ancient river channel. Officials...

2008-09-23 00:00:02

Home in brief *Archaeologists have pinpointed the construction of Stonehenge to 2300BC - 300 years later than thought. During a major excavation inside the henge in April - the first for four decades - professors Tim Darvill and Geoff Wainwright carbon-dated the ring's original bluestones, taken 150 miles from west Wales to Salisbury Plain, where they stand today. They also found fragments of stone which, they argue, could have been used as lucky charms - supporting a theory that it was a...

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2008-05-29 14:00:00

Researchers in Britain are discussing the possibility that Stonehenge may have been erected as an ancient burial ground for the royal family. Although archaeologists previously thought people were buried at the site between 2700 and 2600 B.C., Mike Parker Pearson, an archaeologist at the University of Sheffield, says radiocarbon dating of human remains at the site shows it was used as a cemetery just after 3000 B.C. until after the larger circle of stones were placed. "The hypothesis we are...

2006-10-21 18:00:21

By JIM MCBETH THE smiles and convivial air say it all. They are obviously all close friends or family, dressed in their best clothes and fine jewellery for a quiet get-together. It's the Bronze Age and the first Scots to introduce the social ritual of having people round for drinks are ready to party. Meet the ancestors the weekend wouldn't be the same without them. We take for granted the conviviality of Scottish culture, but it was defined 4,000 years ago by a mysterious race that,...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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