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Latest Heritability of autism Stories

2011-04-28 14:40:35

By dividing individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into four subtypes according to similarity of symptoms and reanalyzing existing genome-wide genetic data on these individuals vs. controls, researchers at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences have identified 18 novel and highly significant genetic markers for ASD. In addition, ten of the variants were associated with more than one ASD subtype, providing partial replication of these genetic markers....

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2011-03-21 12:20:00

A research team from Duke University in North Carolina has recreated autistic mice by mutating the gene which controls production of the protein, Shank3. The single protein may trigger autistic spectrum disorders by disrupting communication between brain cells, BBC News is reporting. Autism affects the ability of children and adults to communicate and interact socially and has varying degrees of severity. Hundreds of genes linked to the condition have been found. However the precise...

2011-03-01 14:07:39

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia study shows extensive complexity of autism genetics New research on the genomics of autism confirms that the genetic roots of the disorder are highly complicated, but that common biological themes underlie this complexity. In the current study, researchers have implicated several new candidate genes and genomic variants as contributors to autism, and conclude that many more remain to be discovered. While the gene alterations are individually very rare, they...

2011-01-25 15:06:00

MELBOURNE, Fla., Jan. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a study published in Molecular Psychiatry by Dr. Daniel Rossignol (International Child Development Resource Center, Melbourne FL, Aid for Autism) and Dr. Richard Frye (University of Texas), children with autism are more likely to have abnormal function of a key part of the cell called the mitochondria (http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/mp2010136a.html). Mitochondria are best known for producing energy for the...

2010-12-17 13:44:07

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that when one copy of the SHANK3 gene in mice is missing, nerve cells do not effectively communicate and do not show cellular properties associated with normal learning. This discovery may explain how mutations affecting SHANK3 may lead to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The research is currently published in Molecular Autism. "We know that SHANK3 mutation plays a central, causative role in some forms of autism spectrum disorders,...

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2010-11-04 12:45:00

Researchers have identified the deletion of a genomic region on chromosome 17 as a significant risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. A mutation of one of the genes in the deleted interval already is a known cause of renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). The research, by an international collaboration of scientists led by Emory University, will be published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Lead author of the study is Daniel Moreno-De-Luca, MD, MSc,...

2010-09-15 19:15:05

Results announced by Autism Speaks and the world's leading autism experts Autism Speaks, the world's largest autism science and advocacy organization, and an international consortium of researchers, along with participating families, joined together to announce additional new autism genetic discoveries. The results were published today in Science Translational Medicine. Based on analysis of genomes collected from almost 2,250 individuals, including almost 2,000 with ASD and 246 with...

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2010-09-01 13:44:21

Research findings show subtle differences that parents and professionals may easily overlook Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today new study results showing an early marker for later communication and social delays in infants at a higher-risk for autism may be infrequent gazing at other people when unprompted. Published in the September issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, the study also found that six-month-old high-risk infants demonstrated the same level of cause...

2010-09-01 08:00:00

Research Findings Show Subtle Differences that Parents and Professionals May Easily Overlook BALTIMORE, Sept. 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Kennedy Krieger Institute announced today new study results showing an early marker for later communication and social delays in infants at a higher-risk for autism may be infrequent gazing at other people when unprompted. Published in the September issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, the study also found that six-month-old...

2010-08-18 02:51:30

Everyone is special in their own unique way. From a genetic point of view, no two humans are genetically identical. This means that DNA for each individual contains variants that are more or less comm. on in the overall population. Some gene variations are actually genetic deletions, where sections of DNA 'code' are missing entirely. These variants are likely to have important effects on gene function and, therefore, likely to contribute to diseases associated with that gene. But what happens...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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