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Latest Herpetology Stories

New Toad Discovered In 'Warm Valleys' Of Peruvian Andes
2014-01-17 11:21:45

Pensoft Publishers A new species of toad was discovered hiding in the leaf litter of the Peruvian Yungas. The word is used widely by the locals to describe ecoregion of montane rainforests, and translates as "warm valley" in English. The new species Rhinella yunga was baptized after its habitat preference. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys. Like many other toads of the family Bufonidae the new species Rhinella yunga has a cryptic body coloration resembling the...

Video Footage Reveals Novel Insights Into Crocodilian Foraging Behaviors
2014-01-16 07:46:56

Public Library of Science Animal-borne camera reveals that alligators may attempt to capture prey most often at night, even though the calculated probability of catching prey is highest in the morning, according to a study published in PLOS ONE on January 15, 2014 by James Nifong from the University of Florida and colleagues from other institutions. Observing the behaviors of dangerous and cryptic predators like alligators is no easy task, so scientists used animal-borne cameras to...

GPS Tracks Leatherback Turtle Hotspots To Prevent Fishing Deaths
2014-01-09 07:50:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most endangered species in the world, the Pacific Ocean's leatherback sea turtle population has declined by more than 90 percent since 1980. One of the greatest causes of this species' death is industrial longline fishing, which sets thousands of hooks in the ocean to catch fish, but sometimes catch turtles as well. Research teams use modern GPS technology to predict where fisheries and turtles will interact in order...

sea monster pigment
2014-01-09 04:50:18

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Newly discovered fossilized skin pigments from a trio of multi-million-year-old marine reptiles reveal that these real-life sea monsters were at least partially dark colored when they were alive, according to research appearing in the latest edition of the journal Nature. The fact that creatures such as mosasaurs and ichthyosaurs were dark-colored is likely to have contributed to more efficient thermoregulation, while also serving...

Controversial Finding Changes Previous Belief That Ancestor Of Snakes And Lizards Laid Eggs
2013-12-17 13:54:14

George Washington University The ancestor of snakes and lizards likely gave birth to live young, rather than laid eggs, and over time species have switched back and forth in their preferred reproductive mode, according to research published in print in Ecology Letters Dec. 17. "This is a very unusual and controversial finding, and a major overturn of an accepted school of thought," said Alex Pyron, Robert F. Griggs Assistant Professor of Biology in the Columbian College of Arts and...

Climate, Nesting Patterns Suggest Loggerhead Turtles Are Recovering
2013-12-17 10:06:48

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For loggerhead sea turtles, the number of returning nesting females in the Northwest Atlantic combined with favorable climate conditions in the preceding years are strongly related to the number of nests produced in a given year, according to a study published this month in the journal PLOS ONE. Furthermore, in what may be good news for loggerheads, which are considered threatened under the US Endangered Species Act, nesting...

Chameleon Colors Used To Communicate
2013-12-12 09:28:13

[ Watch the Video: Communicating Chameleons Rely On Color ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While the color-changing abilities of chameleons are typically thought of as a defense mechanism, new research published online Wednesday in the journal Biology Letters suggests that the lizards could actually use the trait to communicate with other chameleons as well. Doctoral candidate Russell Ligon and associate professor Kevin McGraw of the Arizona State University...

Endangered Iguanas Health Compromised By Being Fed By Tourists
2013-12-06 05:54:37

Oxford University Press Feeding wildlife is an increasingly common tourist activity, but a new study published online today by the journal Conservation Physiology shows that already-imperilled iguanas are suffering further physiological problems as a result of being fed by tourists. Charles Knapp, PhD, of the John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago and colleagues compared the differences in physiological values and endoparasitic infection rates between northern Bahamian rock iguanas...

Crocs Use Lures To Catch Birds
2013-12-05 13:03:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Alternately lethargic and viciously violent, crocodilians are not often thought of as cunning, duplicitous predators. However, a new study in the journal Ethology, Ecology and Evolution has found that these massive reptiles sometimes use sticks and twigs to lure in unsuspecting birds, particularly during nest-building season. "Our research provides a surprising insight into previously unrecognized complexity of extinct reptile...

2013-12-04 23:04:31

The authors of an article featured in Herpetologica studied whether male water dragons use their colorful bellies for social dominance, as observed among other lizard species. The dragons used their bellies in various behavioral displays, some resulting in fights and others in less intense responses. Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) December 04, 2013 Herpetologica – Many lizard species rely on a conspicuous color to warn other males trespassing on their territory. Male Eastern Water Dragons in...


Latest Herpetology Reference Libraries

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

Mole Salamander, Ambystoma talpoideum
2014-02-06 08:52:19

The Mole salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) is a member of the Ambystomatidae family and may also be referred to as the tadpole salamander. Commonly found in eastern and central United States, the Mole Salamander ranges from Florida to Texas, Illinois to Kentucky and Virginia. The Mole salamander inhabits damp areas that are generally close to a water source. Commonly found under logs or moist leaves the Mole salamander dwells in forested and sandy pine habitats. The Mole salamander will...

Coastal giant salamander, Dicamptodon tenebrosus
2014-02-04 09:37:14

The Coastal giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) is a member of the Dicamptodontidae family. The species is native to the United States and Canada. The Coastal giant salamander ranges from northern California to Oregon and Washington and throughout parts of south British Columbia. The Coastal giant salamander inhabits freshwater lakes, marshes and rivers. The species may also be found in temperate deciduous forests. A nocturnal species, the Coastal giant salamander may or may not go...

California giant salamander, Dicamptodon ensatus
2014-02-04 09:07:49

The California giant salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) is a member of the Dicamptodontidae family. The species is native only to northern California. The California giant salamander inhabits moist, coastal forests or streams, lakes and ponds. Some of the species may remain gilled aquatic creatures, while others transform and become terrestrial land creatures. The California giant is nocturnal and most of its life is spent hiding and burrowing. Typically, the California giant salamander...

Barred tiger salamander, Ambystoma mavortium
2014-02-03 09:13:58

The Barred tiger salamander (Ambystoma mavortium) is also referred to as the Western tiger salamander. It’s a type of Mole salamander and a member of the Ambystomatidae family. This species ranges vastly from southwestern Canada in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, south through the western United States to Texas and into northern Mexico. Habitats often include forested or prairie areas near to a water source. The common name, Barred tiger salamander, is derived from...

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