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Latest Herpetology Stories

Understanding Origins Of Flight With Wind Tunnel
2013-09-18 10:40:09

[ Watch The Video: Wind Tunnel Helps Understand Bird Flight ] Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Recent research has uncovered the evolutionary origin of birds, as the limbs of certain dinosaurs transformed into wings and gave these creatures the ability to fly. Scientists at the University of Southampton have taken this research one step farther and now say they understand how feathered dinosaurs developed the ability to use these wings for flight. For years...

Avian Evolution: How Raptor Limbs Became Bird Wings
2013-09-18 06:09:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists are certain that sometime around 150 million years ago birds originated from a group of small, meat-eating theropod dinosaurs called maniraptorans. According to recent studies conducted around the world, the maniraptorans were very bird-like, with feathers, hollow bones, small body sizes and high metabolic rates. What remains unclear is at what point the forelimbs evolved into wings, making it possible for the maniraptorans...

Ancient Crocodile Diversity
2013-09-11 12:31:02

[ Watch the Video: Crocodiles Thrived During Prehistoric Times ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Ancient relatives of crocodiles had a wide range of habitats and ecosystems, with some species built like domestic dogs and others built for swimming through the open seas. Using a combination of morphological and biomechanical metrics to analyze these ancient crocodilians, a new study from researchers at the University of Bristol in the UK identified distinct trends...

2013-09-10 23:01:29

South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program Sea Turtle Release Planned for this Saturday Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) September 10, 2013 Three sea turtles successfully rehabilitated by the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program are ready to return to the sea. One green sea turtle, Crosby, one Kemp’s ridley sea turtle, Parker, and one loggerhead sea turtle, Skully, will be released at the Isle of Palms County Park at 10 a.m., this Saturday, September, 14, 2013. The...

Polluted Habitats Force Snapping Turtles To Move Into Urban Settings
2013-08-28 11:09:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online People swimming in the Midwest’s lakes and ponds are often on the lookout for snapping turtles, which are said to be capable of taking off fingers or toes with their powerful jaws and sharp beak. A new study published in the journal Urban Ecosystems indicates that human pollution and waste could be increasingly forcing these turtles out of their more natural habitats and closer to humans. "Snapping turtles are animals that can...

2013-08-16 23:04:14

Join the South Carolina Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue Program for a One-of-a-kind Golf Tournament. Charleston, S.C. (PRWEB) August 16, 2013 Show off your golf game while supporting a great cause! Join the South Carolina Aquarium for the second annual Tees & Turtles Golf Tournament taking place September 10, 2013 at the Daniel Island Country Club on Daniel Island, S.C. Teams of golfers are invited to come out and play on one of Charleston’s most beautiful courses, the Beresford...

Early Birds Get A Leg Up Due To Shortening Of Tails
2013-08-14 07:23:49

University of Oxford A radical shortening of their bony tails over 100 million years ago enabled the earliest birds to develop versatile legs that gave them an evolutionary edge, a new study shows. A team led by Oxford University scientists examined fossils of the earliest birds from the Cretaceous Period, 145-66 million years ago, when early birds, such as Confuciusornis, Eoenantiornis, and Hongshanornis, lived alongside their dinosaur kin. At this point birds had already evolved...

2013-07-25 23:02:53

Rehabilitation Success Story Plus Sea Turtle Release Charleston, SC (PRWEB) July 25, 2013 Big news out of the South Carolina Aquarium’s Sea Turtle Rescue Program-- an adult female loggerhead rehabilitated at the hospital and released in 2010 is contributing to the sea turtle population, and three sea turtles are ready to be returned to the Atlantic Ocean. More on rehabilitation success story: In 2008, an adult female loggerhead sea turtle was rescued off of Prichard’s Island near...

Sea Turtles In The Gulf Face Offshore Risks
2013-07-16 04:32:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from the US Geological Survey (USGS) reveals threatened loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico can travel up to several hundred miles and visit offshore habitats between nesting events in a single season. This means the turtles are swimming through waters impacted by oil and fishing industries. The findings, published in PLOS ONE, challenge the widely-held view sea turtles remain near one beach throughout...

2013-07-11 12:06:05

A recent U.S. Geological Survey report confirmed that the nation's amphibians, including frogs, toads and salamanders, are disappearing "at an alarming and rapid rate." A biologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that North Carolina's Southern Cricket Frog populations mirror this disturbing national trend. "It's a steady flow of bad news for amphibians," said Jonathan Perry Micancin [mih-CAN-sin], a visiting lecturer and recent Ph.D. graduate in UNC's Biology...


Latest Herpetology Reference Libraries

Dahl’s Aquatic Frog, Litoria dahlii
2014-06-30 14:37:21

Dahl’s Aquatic Frog (Litoria dahlii) is a species of frog belonging to the family Hylidae. It is native to Australia. Its natural habitats include dry savanna, tropical or subtropical dry lowland grassland, freshwater lakes, intermittent freshwater lakes, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marshes. Among the more distinct traits of Dahl’s Aquatic Frog is its ability to consume the eggs, tadpoles and young of the invasive and venomous Cane Toad with no apparent ill...

Hellbender Salamander, Cryptoranchus alleganiensis
2014-05-26 09:58:06

The hellbender salamander (Cryptoranchus alleganiensis), also known as the hellbender, is a species of giant salamander that can be found in eastern areas of North America. Its range includes the states of Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, and some areas of Kansas and Oklahoma. This species is the sole member of its genus, Cryptobranchus, and is one of three living giant salamanders. The origin of the name hellbender is unknown and the species is locally known by many...

Jefferson Salamander, Ambystoma jeffersonianum
2014-05-26 08:49:45

The Jefferson salamander (Ambystoma jeffersonianum) is a species of mole salamander that can be found in northeastern areas of the United States, southwestern areas of Quebec, and central and southern areas of Ontario. This species prefers to reside in deciduous forests. It was named after Jefferson College, which is located in Pennsylvania. This species reaches an average body length between 4.3 inches and 7 inches and can be black, gray, or brown in color with lighter coloring on its front...

Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile
2014-05-26 07:53:38

The northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) is a species of mole salamander that can be found along the Pacific Coast of North America. Its range extends from May Island in southeastern Alaska to the Gulala River in Sonoma County, California. It resides in a number of habitats from sea level to the timberline, including grasslands and woodlands, but cannot be found east of the Great Divide. It holds two subspecies known as A. g. decorticatum and A. g. gracile, which are separated by a...

2014-04-22 14:52:09

Edwin Harris Colbert (September 28, 1905 – November 15, 2001), known as “Ned” to his friends and colleagues, was a distinguished American Paleontologist. He helped popularize the study of dinosaurs through his prolific research, writings, and 40 years of work as a curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Colbert was born in Clarinda, Iowa, but moved to Maryville, Missouri during infancy. Like many young children, and most of his predecessors and contemporaries,...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.