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Herring Reference Libraries

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Pacific herring
2007-04-03 00:31:37

The Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, is a species of the herring family associated with the Pacific Ocean environment of North America and northeast Asia. This species is a silvery fish with unspined fins and a deeply forked caudal fin. The distribution is widely along the California coast from Baja California north to Alaska and the Bering Sea; in Asia the distribution is south to Japan....

Atlantic herring
2007-04-03 00:29:38

The Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus, is the one of the most abundant species of fish on the planet. They can be found on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean congregating together in large schools (or swarms). They can grow up to 17.72 in (45 cm) in length and weigh more than 1.1 lb (0.5 kg). They feed on copepods, krill and small fish, and their natural predators are seals, whales, cod and other...

Atlantic menhaden
2007-04-03 00:27:56

The Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) is a silvery, highly compressed fish in the herring family, Clupeidae. A filter feeder, it lives on plankton caught in midwater. An adult fish can filter up to four gallons of water a minute and they play an important role in clarifying ocean water. They are also a natural check to the deadly red tide. Menhaden occur in large numbers in the North...

Australian salmon
2007-02-21 17:17:07

Australian salmon are medium-sized perciform marine fish of the small family Arripidae. Four species are recognized, all within the genus Arripis; they are found in the waters off southern Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Despite the common name, Australian salmon are not related to the salmon (family Salmonidae) of the Northern Hemisphere; the former were named so by early...

Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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