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Latest Himalayas Stories

2008-10-10 18:00:35

HILL walker Doug Smith took on Everest just 18 months after a cancer operation. The 66-year-old, who is originally from Kirkby, headed to the Himalayas 18 months after eight hours of keyhole surgery to remove his oesophagus at Fazakerley hospital. He said: "I have always wanted to do something different and Everest was certainly that. We were all ages and nationalities - they called me 'Grandad', but I had no problems with altitude. "It took us 12 days to trek to Kala Pattha, (the...

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2008-06-11 13:14:37

About 15,000 feet up on Tibet's desolate Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau, an international research team led by Florida State University geologist Yang Wang was surprised to find thick layers of ancient lake sediment filled with plant, fish and animal fossils typical of far lower elevations and warmer, wetter climates.Back at the FSU-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes in the fossils revealed the animals' diet (abundant plants) and the reason for...

2008-01-04 15:07:19

Hurricanes and tornadoes have seasons, but do earthquakes? They do in the Himalayas, and it's during the winter. For years, seismologists had observed that far more earthquakes shook the massive Asian mountain range in the winter months than in the summer, but they couldn't pinpoint the cause of this seasonal change. A new study of GPS and satellite data presented last month at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union has connected the increase in earthquake activity to the...

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2007-07-27 09:30:00

VARANASI, India -- WITH HER EYES sealed, Ramedi cupped the murky water of the Ganges River in her hands, lifted them toward the sun and prayed for her husband, her 15 grandchildren and her bad hip. She, like India's other 800 million Hindus, has absolute faith that the river she calls Ganga Ma can heal. Around Ramedi, who like some Indians has only one name, people converged on the riverbank in the early morning, before the day's heat set in. Women floated necklaces of marigolds on a boat of...

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2007-04-07 14:45:00

BEND, Ore. -- Mountaineers are bringing back firsthand accounts of vanishing glaciers, melting ice routes, crumbling rock formations and flood-prone lakes where glaciers once rose. The observations are transforming a growing number of alpine and ice climbers, some of whom have scientific training, into eyewitnesses of global warming. Increasingly, they are deciding not to leave it to scientists to tell the entire story. "I personally have done a bunch of ice climbs around the world that no...

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2007-03-27 15:36:01

The Himalaya, the "Roof of the World", source of the seven largest rivers of Asia are, like other mountain chains, suffering the effects of global warming. To assess the extent of melting of its 33,000 km2 of glaciers, scientists have been using a process they have been pioneering for some years. Satellite-imagery derived glacier surface topographies obtained at intervals of a few years were adjusted and compared. Calculations indicated that 915 km2 of Himalayan glaciers of the test region,...

2006-07-22 09:51:30

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - A search party has found the body of one of Latin America's leading climbers, who went went missing 10 days ago on Pakistan's Nanga Parbat, the world's ninth-highest peak, a diplomat said on Saturday. Jose Antonio Delgado, a 41-year-old Venezuelan, became stranded in bad weather at a height of 24,280 feet (7,400 meters) during his ascent of "The Killer Mountain," as Nanga Parbat is otherwise known. "All the elements suggest it is the body of Jose Antonio...

2006-07-06 00:18:47

By Y.P. Rajesh NATHU LA, China-India Border (Reuters) - Asian giants India and China opened a Himalayan pass to border trade on Thursday, 44 years after a brutal frontier war shut down the ancient route. Senior officials from Tibet and the tiny northeastern Indian state of Sikkim cut a ribbon marking the border at the Nathu La pass as freezing rain poured down. Soldiers held up umbrellas instead of the automatic rifles they usually carry. A thick mist obscured visibility. Scores of...

2006-07-05 19:23:12

By Y.P. Rajesh GANGTOK, India (Reuters) - Asian giants India and China resume border trade through a Himalayan pass on Thursday, hoping to build on warming relations and curb smuggling, 44 years after a brutal border war closed the ancient route. Businessmen from Tibet and the tiny northeastern Indian state of Sikkim will cross over into each other's territory through the border post at Nathu La pass -- which means the pass of the listening ear -- and trade at newly built marts on...

2006-06-09 07:18:09

By Simon Denyer NATHU-LA, India (Reuters) - As the rain sweeps across the high Himalayan pass, a Chinese soldier arrives at the three strands of barbed wire which separate his country's territory from that of long-time rival India. But this soldier is no longer brandishing a gun, on this once most sensitive of borders between the world's two most populous countries. Instead he takes some video for his family back home and pauses to shake hands across the rusty fence. Just a few...


Latest Himalayas Reference Libraries

Sir Edmund Percival Hillary
2014-01-06 11:03:49

Sir Edmund Percival Hillary was a New Zealand mountaineer, explorer and philanthropist. Hillary was born to Percival Augustus Hillary and Gertrude Hillary in Auckland, Dominion of New Zealand on July 20th of 1919. In 1920 his family moved to Tuakau, after his father was given land there. His grandparents were early settlers in the northern part of Wairoa in the middle of the 19th century after emigrating from Yorkshire, England. On May 29th of 1953, Hillary and Nepalese Sherpa mountaineer...

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2008-05-05 23:33:38

The Yellow-throated Marten or Himalayan Marten (Martes flavigula), is a species of marten found in Asia. It ranges through the temperate mountainous forests of the Himalayas, Southeast Asia, and East Asia, including the Russian Far East and the Korean Peninsula. It is generally solitary. It is distinguished from the Stone Marten by its large size and long limbs and tail; its tail makes up nearly half of the total body length. An adult may weigh as much as 7.5 pounds, and may be more than...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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