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Latest Histone Stories

2013-04-02 10:30:31

Most cancer treatments are blunt. In an attempt to eradicate tumors, oncologists often turn to radiation or chemotherapy, which can damage healthy tissue along with the cancerous growths. New research from C. David Allis' laboratory at Rockefeller University may bring scientists closer to designing cancer therapeutics that can target tumors with pinpoint accuracy. Their findings, published last week in Science Express, follow a recent series of discoveries by several international genome...

2013-02-04 10:19:38

Double-strand breaks in DNA happen every time a cell divides and replicates. Depending on the type of cell, that can be pretty often. Many proteins are involved in everyday DNA repair, but if they are mutated, the repair system breaks down and cancer can occur. Cells have two complicated ways to repair these breaks, which can affect the stability of the entire genome. Roger A. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., associate investigator, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute and associate professor...

To Test 'Histone Code' Researchers Exploit Gene Position
2013-01-03 13:25:12

University of California - San Diego In a novel use of gene knockout technology, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine tested the same gene inserted into 90 different locations in a yeast chromosome — and discovered that while the inserted gene never altered its surrounding chromatin landscape, differences in that immediate landscape measurably affected gene activity. The findings, published online in the Jan. 3 issue of Cell Reports,...

Honeybee Histone Code Found
2012-12-12 20:06:33

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers have uncovered a new element of the honeybee's genetic makeup, shedding light on why bees are so sensitive to environmental changes. Scientists found honeybees have a "histone code," which is a series of marks on the histone proteins around which their DNA is wrapped to help fit into the nucleus of a cell. This code is known to exist in humans and other organisms in order to control changes in cell development....

Fruit Fly Studies Guide Researchers To Misregulated Mechanism In Human Cancers
2012-11-19 15:21:04

Stowers Institute for Medical Research Changes in how DNA interacts with histones–the proteins that package DNA–regulate many fundamental cell activities from stem cells maturing into a specific body cell type or blood cells becoming leukemic. These interactions are governed by a biochemical tug of war between repressors and activators, which chemically modify histones signaling them to clamp down tighter on DNA or move aside and allow a gene to be expressed. In the November...

2012-10-01 16:28:13

Over the last two decades, scientists have come to understand that the genetic code held within DNA represents only part of the blueprint of life. The rest comes from specific patterns of chemical tags that overlay the DNA structure, determining how tightly the DNA is packaged and how accessible certain genes are to be switched on or off. As researchers have uncovered more and more of these "epigenetic" tags, they have begun to wonder how they are all connected. Now, research from the...

2012-08-27 11:45:43

Researchers show how repressor proteins ensure accurate gene expression by thwarting histone exchange Two opposing teams battle it out to regulate gene expression on the DNA playing field. One, the activators, keeps DNA open to enzymes that transcribe DNA into RNA. Their repressor opponents antagonize that effort by twisting DNA into an inaccessible coil around histone proteins, an amalgam called chromatin, effectively blocking access to DNA by enzymes that elongate an RNA strand. Both...

2012-08-24 00:35:59

Thomas Jefferson University team shifts a longstanding paradigm for epigenetic markers It's widely accepted that molecular mechanisms mediating epigenetics include DNA methylation and histone modifications, but a team from Thomas Jefferson University has evidence to the contrary regarding the role of histone modifications. A study of Drosophila embryos from Jefferson's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology published ahead of print in Cell August 23 found that parental...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.