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Latest Histone Stories

2010-04-22 16:57:33

New on-off switches: SUMO protein silences developmental genes, SNP2 snips SUMO to allow gene expression HOUSTON "“ Deleting a gene in mouse embryos caused cardiac defects and early death, leading researchers to identify a mechanism that turns developmental genes off and on as an embryo matures, a team led by a scientist at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported today in Molecular Cell. "Our study focused on regulation of two genes that are critical to the healthy...

2010-03-10 03:00:00

Collaboration Exploits Cellzome's World-Leading Proteomics Technology in Epigenetics CAMBRIDGE, England and HEIDELBERG, Germany, March 10, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellzome today announced that it has formed a second strategic alliance with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). This new collaboration gives GSK exclusive access to Cellzome's proprietary Episphere(TM) technology in the emerging field of epigenetics as applied to immunoinflammatory disease. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in...

2010-02-25 13:44:55

A paper published online today in Molecular Cell proposes that Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) impacts the entire genome in neurons, rather than acting as a regulator of specific genes. Mutations in MeCP2 cause the autism spectrum disorder Rett Syndrome as well as some cases of neuropsychiatric problems including autism, schizophrenia and learning disabilities. The discovery of MeCP2's global reach was made in the laboratory of Adrian Bird, Ph.D. of the University of Edinburgh. Bird's...

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2010-02-19 15:07:30

Discovery could lead to new drugs for combating spread of deadly disease Malaria remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases. Yet, how Plasmodium, the malaria parasite, regulates its infectious cycle has remained an enigma despite decades of rigorous research. But now a team led by a cell biologist at the University of California, Riverside has identified a mechanism by which Plasmodium intensively replicates itself in human blood to spread the disease. "If this mechanism can be...

2010-02-16 09:45:00

SPARTA, N.J. and LIEGE, Belgium, Feb. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Diagenode, an innovative leader providing products and technologies for epigenetics, genomics and diagnostics, and the only provider of complete epigenetics solutions, announced today the launch of its innovative platform for automated epigenetics assays, the SX-8G IP-Star(TM) system ("IP-Star(TM)). The introduction follows the successful completion of six independent collaborations with high-profile research laboratories in the...

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2010-01-21 11:29:46

A viral infection is like an uninvited, tenacious houseguest in the cell, using a range of tricks to prevent its eviction. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified one of the key proteins allowing herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA to fly under the radar of their hosts' involuntary hospitality. Their findings, to be published in a forthcoming issue of The EMBO Journal, reveal one of the tactics that HSV employs in order to overcome its hosts' defenses and may...

2010-01-07 18:03:35

Plants are incredibly temperature sensitive and can perceive changes of as little as one degree Celsius. Now, a report in the January 8th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, shows how they not only 'feel' the temperature rise, but also coordinate an appropriate response -- activating hundreds of genes and deactivating others; it turns out it's all about the way that their DNA is packaged. The findings may help to explain how plants will respond in the face of climate change...

2009-12-25 21:50:53

Like a child awaiting the arrival of Christmas, embryonic stem cells exist in a state of permanent anticipation. They must balance the ability to quickly become more specialized cell types with the cellular chaos that could occur should they act too early (stop shaking those presents, kids!). Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have now identified a critical component, called Jarid2, of this delicate balancing act "” one that both recruits other regulatory proteins...

2009-12-20 12:34:09

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have determined the structures of two enzymes that customize histones, the spool-like proteins around which DNA coils inside the cell. The structures provide insight into how DNA's packaging is just as important and intricate as the information in the DNA itself, and how these enzymes are part of a system of inspectors making sure the packaging is in order. The results are published online this week in the journal Nature Structural and...

2009-11-20 12:11:29

A team led by Penn State's Ross Hardison, T. Ming Chu Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has taken a large step toward unraveling how regulatory proteins control the production of gene products during development and growth. Working with collaborators including Drs. Mitchell Weiss and Gerd Blobel at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, they focused specifically on the complex process of producing red blood cells (erythrocytes). These cells contain large amounts of hemoglobin, a...