Quantcast

Latest HIV disease progression rates Stories

2012-05-29 09:02:10

Potential role in HIV treatment and prevention under study Scientists have identified a new HIV-suppressing protein in the blood of people infected with the virus. In laboratory studies, the protein, called CXCL4 or PF-4, binds to HIV such that it cannot attach to or enter a human cell. The research was led by Paolo Lusso, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Section of Viral Pathogenesis in the Laboratory of Immunoregulation at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part...

2011-07-01 13:00:09

NIH media availability WHAT: A trio of large-scale genome-wide association studies, or GWAS, have identified more than 15 gene variants responsible for the diversity of white blood cell counts among whites, African-Americans, and Japanese. Supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, each study examined the genomes of tens of thousands of people. Combined, the studies offer the first comprehensive analysis into why some people, and some populations, have more or fewer white blood...

2011-06-30 01:39:56

Research appears in June 30 issue of Nature, highlights link between innate immune system and viral defense factors Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered a long-sought cellular factor that works to inhibit HIV infection of myeloid cells, a subset of white blood cells that display antigens and hence are important for the body's immune response against viruses and other pathogens. The factor, a protein called SAMHD1, is part of the nucleic acid...

2010-04-29 13:21:45

Limited success in modeling the behavior of the complex, unusual and unpredictable HIV virus has slowed efforts to develop an effective vaccine to prevent AIDS. A new improved modeling system, developed by Chinese researchers, which attempts to incorporate more of the virus' random behavioral dynamics, suggests that a particular type of T cell could be useful in the development of an AIDS vaccine. New research published today, Thursday 29 April, in New Journal of Physics (co-owned by the...

2009-09-23 06:00:00

RICHMOND, Calif., Sept. 23 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: SGMO) announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reviewed and accepted an Investigational New Drug (IND) application to initiate an open-label, repeat-dosing Phase 1 clinical trial (SB-728-T-902) of the company's ZFN-based therapeutic, SB-728-T. A single dose Phase 1 clinical study of SB-728-T was initiated in February 2009 and is ongoing at the University of Pennsylvania. Both...

2009-07-13 13:30:56

One of the continuing mysteries of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is why women usually develop lower viral levels than men following acute HIV-1 infection but progress faster to AIDS than men with similar viral loads. Now a research team based at the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), MIT and Harvard has found that a receptor molecule involved in the first-line recognition of HIV-1 responds to the virus differently in women, leading to subsequent differences in chronic T cell...

2009-04-15 14:14:50

People with the ability to stave off AIDS for years after initial infection by HIV have been called "long-term non-progressors" or "elite controllers." One component of this remarkable resistance comes from an individual's HLA genes. Long-term non-progressors tend to have HLA genes that help the immune system recognize and fight HIV more efficiently. A team of researchers from the Emory Vaccine Center studying HIV-infected people with particularly effective HLA genes has observed how the...

78eba79291bd4015b7fdd923b80f4c471
2008-07-17 16:35:00

New research has found that a gene variant may make Africans more vulnerable to HIV infection, while also helping them live longer once infected. The genetic variation originated thousands of years ago to protect Africans from malaria, the researchers said Wednesday. The gene involved in the study controls a surface protein on red blood cells. Those with the genetic variation were found to have a 40 percent higher risk of becoming infected with HIV, researchers in the United States and...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related