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Latest Holocene Stories

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2012-05-29 21:59:26

Michael Harper for RedOrbit.com The age-old struggle between classes may be even older than we thought, according to a new study carried out by archaeologists from the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff and Oxford. According to their research, hereditary inequality may have begun as early as 7,000 years ago in the Neolithic era. The archeologists found evidence showing farmers who were buried with tools were also buried in better land than those farmers without. The research was...

2012-04-16 21:48:21

The NSF-funded research will be presented at the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Memphis, Tenn. University of Cincinnati research is revealing early farming in a former wetlands region that was largely cut off from Western researchers until recently. The UC collaboration with the Southern Albania Neolithic Archaeological Project (SANAP) will be presented April 20 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA). Susan Allen, a professor in the UC...

2012-02-04 04:37:33

A team of Spanish researchers have used different geological samples, extracted from the Enol lake in Asturias, to show that the Holocene, a period that started 11,600 years ago, did not have a climate as stable as was believed. The Holocene period, which includes the last 11,600 years of our history, has always been described as a stable period in terms of climatic conditions, especially when compared to the abrupt changes that occurred in the last ice age, which ended around 10,000 years...

Insects Offer Clues To Ancient Climate Variability 10,000
2011-11-15 11:55:51

An analysis of the remains of ancient midges — tiny non-biting insects closely related to mosquitoes — opens a new window on the past with a detailed view of the surprising regional variability that accompanied climate warming during the early Holocene epoch, 10,000 to 5,500 years ago. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of British Columbia looked at the abundance and variety of midge larvae buried in lake sediments in Alaska. Midges are highly...

2011-07-05 13:52:48

As the Sun enters a period of low solar activity over the next 50 years, new research has calculated the probability of unusually cold winter temperatures occurring in the UK. Last year, the same group of researchers, from the University of Reading, linked colder winters in Europe to low solar activity and predicted that the Sun is moving into a particularly low period of activity, meaning the UK will experience more cold winters in the future "“ potentially similar to those experienced...

2011-06-01 08:24:00

MILWAUKEE, June 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Economist, a globally-recognized international affairs magazine, has reported that scientists and academics are increasingly reaching a consensus that the impact of human activity has so dramatically shaped the Earth as to herald a new geological age. The power of human potential was also identified by ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN), the world leader in innovative workforce solutions, earlier this year as being behind the dawn of the Human Age, where...

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2011-02-02 22:26:36

Human influence on the landscape, global warming, sea level rise, ocean acidification and biodiversity are highlighted in a new set of studies led by University of Leicester researchers.How this influence will be reflected in the distinctive geological record forms the basis of the studies published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A.Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams from the University of Leicester Department of Geology led the production of the studies into the...

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2010-12-06 07:53:36

For years, geologists have argued about the processes that formed steep inner gorges in the broad glacial valleys of the Swiss Alps. The U-shaped valleys were created by slow-moving glaciers that behaved something like road graders, eroding the bedrock over hundreds or thousands of years. When the glaciers receded, rivers carved V-shaped notches, or inner gorges, into the floors of the glacial valleys. But scientists disagreed about whether those notches were erased by subsequent glaciers and...

2010-10-01 14:46:49

An analysis of geological records that preserve details of the last known period of global warming has revealed 'startling' results which suggest current targets for limiting climate change are unsafe. The study by climate change experts at the University of Exeter has important implications for international negotiators aiming to agree binding targets for future greenhouse gas emission targets. Professor Chris Turney and Dr Richard Jones, both from the University's Department of Geography,...


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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