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Latest Homeostasis Stories

2014-05-27 16:00:39

Norwegian University of Science and Technology Norwegian researchers use large database and computer model to understand high blood pressure High blood pressure is highly age-related and affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. But doctors can't fully explain the cause of 90 per cent of all cases. A computer model of a "virtual human" suggests that stiff arteries alone are enough to cause high blood pressure. "Our results suggest that arterial stiffness represents a major...

2014-05-09 13:42:49

Institute of Physics An implantable device that reduces blood pressure by sending electrical signals to the brain has been created by a group of researchers in Germany. The device has successfully reduced the blood pressure in rats by 40 per cent without any major side effects, and could offer hope for a significant proportion of patients worldwide who do not respond to existing medical treatment for the condition. The first results have been published today, 9 May, in IOP...

Deep Brain Region Controls How Quickly We Make Decisions About Love
2014-02-14 12:47:19

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a study published in the journal Current Trends in Neurology, a region found deep within the brain is able to control how quickly people make decisions about love. The research is the first to provide causal clinical evidence that an area of the brain known as the anterior insula plays an instrumental role in love. “The current work makes it possible to disentangle love from other biological drives,” the authors...

Smart Materials Getting SMARTer
2012-07-11 17:36:59

Self-powered, homeostatic nanomaterials that actively self-regulate in response to environmental change Living organisms have developed sophisticated ways to maintain stability in a changing environment, withstanding fluctuations in temperature, pH, pressure, and the presence or absence of crucial molecules. The integration of similar features in artificial materials, however, has remained a challenge–until now. In the July 12 issue of Nature, a Harvard-led team of engineers...

2012-05-22 02:23:17

Max Planck scientists discover brain cells in monkeys that may be linked to self-awareness and empathy in humans The anterior insular cortex is a small brain region that plays a crucial role in human self-awareness and in related neuropsychiatric disorders. A unique cell type — the von Economo neuron (VEN) — is located there. For a long time, the VEN was assumed to be unique to humans, great apes, whales and elephants. Henry Evrard, neuroanatomist at the Max Planck Institute...

2012-04-10 09:01:48

The part of the brain we use when engaging in egalitarian behavior may also be linked to a larger sense of morality, researchers have found. Their conclusions, which offer scientific support for Adam Smith's theories of morality, are based on experimental research published in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, coming seven months after the start of the Occupy Wall Street Movement, which has been aimed at addressing income inequality, was...

2012-03-21 00:30:56

Scans reveal how genes alter circuit hub to shape temperament -- NIH study A personality profile marked by overly gregarious yet anxious behavior is rooted in abnormal development of a circuit hub buried deep in the front center of the brain, say scientists at the National Institutes of Health. They used three different types of brain imaging to pinpoint the suspect brain area in people with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by these behaviors. Matching the scans to...

2011-01-21 16:12:05

The Insula and Evaluative Processes Gary G. Berntson, Greg J. Norman, Antoine Bechara, Joel Bruss, Daniel Tranel, and John T. Cacioppo The insula has been implicated in evaluative and affective processes. New findings indicate that the insula may be broadly involved in integrating affective and cognitive processes. Participants rated the positivity and negativity of picture stimuli and how emotionally arousing they found the pictures to be. Volunteers with lesions of the insula exhibited...

2010-09-10 14:28:12

There is new evidence that people can learn to control the activity of some brain regions when they get feedback signals provided by functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI). Dr. Andrea Caria and colleagues used this specialized imaging technique during training sessions in three groups of healthy participants who were asked to assess visual emotional stimuli (negative or neutral pictures). The scientists were interested in the signals generated by the insula, a brain region...

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2009-11-29 08:49:46

Researchers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activation have found that men and women respond differently to positive and negative stimuli, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "Men may direct more attention to sensory aspects of emotional stimuli and tend to process them in terms of implications for required action, whereas women direct more attention to the feelings engendered by...


Word of the Day
ambsace
  • Bad luck; misfortune.
  • The smallest amount possible or the most worthless thing.
The word 'ambsace' comes from a Latin word meaning 'both'.