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Latest Hominidae Stories

2010-03-15 15:56:06

When we notice somebody pointing at something, we automatically look in the direction of the gesture. In humans, the ability to understand this type of gesturing (known as declarative communication) may seem to be an automatic response, but it is actually a sign of sophisticated communication behavior. Numerous studies have tried to determine if great apes (for example, chimpanzees and bonobos) are able to understand declarative communication, but results have been mixed. Psychological...

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2010-03-01 15:10:00

Des Moines, Iowa -- You may have more in common with Kanzi, Panbanisha and Nyota, three language-competent bonobos living at Great Ape Trust, than you thought. And those similarities, right at your fingertip, might one day tell scientists more about the effect of culture on neurological disorders that limit human expression. Among humans, pointing is a universal language, an alternative to spoken words to convey a message. Before they speak, infants point, a gesture scientists agree is...

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2010-01-28 14:19:16

New research suggests that evolutionary changes in cognitive development underlie the extensive social and behavioral differences that exist between two closely related species of great apes. The study, published online on January 28th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, enhances our understanding of our two closest living relatives, chimpanzees and the lesser-known bonobos, and may provide key insight into human evolution. Although chimpanzees and bonobos have a very close genetic...

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2009-12-29 08:45:00

The timing of molar emergence and its relation to growth and reproduction in apes was reported by two scientists at Arizona State University's Institute of Human Origins in the Dec. 28 online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). From the smallest South American monkeys to the largest African apes, the timing of molar development and eruption is closely attuned to many fundamental aspects of a primate's biology, according to Gary Schwartz, a researcher...

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2009-12-17 10:10:00

The teeth of some apes are formed primarily to handle the most stressful times when food is scarce, according to new research performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The findings imply that if humanity is serious about protecting its close evolutionary cousins, the food apes eat during these tough periods"”and where they find it"”must be included in conservation efforts. The interdisciplinary team, which brought together anthropologists from George...

2009-10-13 09:45:00

BOSTON, Oct. 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A recently released paper published in the journal Alternatives to Laboratory Animals (ATLA 37, 399-416), presents a serious challenge to long-standing claims that animals are an important part of human cancer research. "An Examination of Chimpanzee Use in Human Cancer Research" found that chimpanzees, our closest genetic relatives, have contributed little to combating cancers and cost society not only time but wasted research dollars. The paper...

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2009-10-09 08:00:00

Among the many surprises associated with the discovery of the oldest known, nearly complete skeleton of a hominid is the finding that this species took its first steps toward bipedalism not on the open, grassy savanna, as generations of scientists "“ going back to Charles Darwin "“ hypothesized, but in a wooded landscape. "This species was not a savanna species like Darwin proposed," said University of Illinois anthropology professor Stanley Ambrose, a co-author of two of 11...

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2009-10-01 12:54:34

A U.S. biological anthropologist says he's determined humans did not evolve from apes, but, rather, apes evolved from humans. Kent State University Professor C. Owen Lovejoy, who specializes in the study of human origins, said his findings came from a study of Ardipithecus ramidus, a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago in what now is Ethiopia. People often think we evolved from apes, but no, apes in many ways evolved from us, Lovejoy said. It has been a popular idea to think...

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2009-10-01 14:55:00

A 17-year investigation into the discovery of the fragile remains of a small "ground ape" discovered in Ethiopia is described today in a special issue of the journal Science. The report includes 11 papers about the discovery of the Ardipithecus fossils, which include a partial skeleton of a female nicknamed "Ardi", the earliest known skeleton from the human branch of the primate family tree.  The branch includes Homo sapiens as well as species closer to humans than to chimpanzees and...

2009-10-01 09:49:00

KENT, Ohio Oct. 1 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Throw out all those posters and books that depict an ape evolving into a human being, says Kent State University Professor of Anthropology Dr. C. Owen Lovejoy. An internationally recognized biological anthropologist who specializes in the study of human origins, Lovejoy is one of the primary authors who revealed their research findings today on Ardipithecus ramidus, a hominid species that lived 4.4 million years ago in what is now Ethiopia....


Latest Hominidae Reference Libraries

Australopithecus africanus
2013-11-29 10:55:07

Australopithecus africanus was an early hominid, an australopithecine that lived between roughly 3.03 and 2.04 million years ago in the later Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Au. africanus was of slender build and was thought to have been a direct ancestor of modern humans. Fossil remains signify that Au. africanus was considerably more like modern humans that Au. afarensis, with a more human-like cranium permitting a larger brain and more humanoid facial features. This hominid has only been...

0_fb61d1b290cba03d06f46aa5e2278549
2007-01-02 11:08:06

The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), also known as the robust chimpanzee, is a great ape. Basic facts Common chimpanzees are found in the tropical forests and wet savannas of Western and Central Africa. They once inhabited most of this region, but their habitat has been dramatically reduced in recent years. Adults in the wild weigh between 88 and 143 lbs (40 and 65 kg). Males can measure up to 63 inches (160 cm) and females up to 51 inches (130 cm). They are lighter than humans...

42_9016802267a95b3cee2c115d4d7027d2
2007-01-02 11:04:49

The mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei) is one of two subspecies of Eastern Gorillas. It is only found in the Virunga volcanic mountains of Central Africa, within three national parks. Some claim that the Bwindi population in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable Forest is a third subspecies. A census taken in 2003 has shown a 17% increase in population size since 1989. There are now a total of 380 gorillas in 30 social groups. However, the mountain gorilla continues to be considered...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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