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Latest Homo erectus Stories

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2012-08-08 21:14:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the human and primate fossil records become more complete, researchers are beginning to see the amount of complexity involved in man´s evolution. That evolutionary tree became even more complex with the discovery of new fossils that suggest there were two additional Homo species living alongside our direct ancestors, Homo erectus, around two million years ago. According to a report published in the journal Nature...

Homo Heidelbergensis Slightly Taller Than The Neanderthal
2012-06-06 10:04:41

The reconstruction of 27 complete human limb bones found in Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain) has helped to determine the height of various species of the Pleistocene era. Homo heilderbergensis, like Neanderthals, were similar in height to the current population of the Mediterranean. Along with its enormous quantity of fossils, one of the most important features of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in Atapuerca, Burgos, is the splendid state of the findings. They are so well conserved that the 27...

Image 1 - 'Taung Child' Fossil Reveals Hominin Brain Evolution
2012-05-08 12:12:29

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com The reexamination of an ancestral human fossil found almost 90 years ago indicates that evolutionary changes in human brain development started 2.5 million years ago, about the time these ancestors began to walk upright. Florida State University researcher Dean Faulk and her colleagues analyzed the 2.2 million-year-old Taung fossil of a 3 to 4-year-old child and found several features that suggest a developed mechanism that allowed for the growth of a more...

Study Claims Human Predecessors Used Fire 1 Million Years Ago
2012-04-03 06:00:52

An international team of researchers say that they have identified one-million year old archaeological evidence that human ancestors used and controlled fire, suggesting that our predecessors may have mastered flame approximately 300,000 years earlier than previously thought. The study, which was led by researchers from the University of Toronto and Hebrew University of Jerusalem and published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), resulted in the discovery...

2012-02-14 08:00:00

The sciences website EurekaMag.com publishes insights into specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review covers the Great White Shark which is a large lamniform shark found in coastal surface waters in all major oceans, Homo Erectus which is an extinct species of humans that lived between 1.3 to 1.8 million years ago, and Vostok station which is a Russian Antarctic research station at the southern Pole of Cold, with the lowest temperature on Earth of –89.2 degrees...

Image 1 - Disappearing Elephant Caused The Rise Of Modern Man
2011-12-13 04:07:29

Dietary change led to the appearance of modern humans in the Middle East 400,000 years ago, say TAU researchers Elephants have long been known to be part of the Homo erectus diet. But the significance of this specific food source, in relation to both the survival of Homo erectus and the evolution of modern humans, has never been understood – until now. When Tel Aviv University researchers Dr. Ran Barkai, Miki Ben-Dor, and Prof. Avi Gopher of TAU's Department of Archaeology and...

2011-09-21 14:52:20

Research at the University of Liverpool has found that periods of rapid fluctuation in temperature coincided with the emergence of the first distant relatives of human beings and the appearance and spread of stone tools. Dr Matt Grove from the School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology reconstructed likely responses of human ancestors to the climate of the past five million years using genetic modeling techniques. When results were mapped against the timeline of human evolution, Dr...

Image 1 - New Evolutionary Link Between Australopiths And Humans
2011-09-09 10:51:52

  [ View Video] New analysis of two-million-year-old hominid bones found in South Africa provide the clearest evidence of evolution´s first major step toward modern humans, evidence that is leading some experts to believe the findings will change longstanding views on the origins of humans. The well-preserved bones, from Australopithecus sediba, are from a part-human, part-ape species that have never been seen before now. The hands are similar to man, it has sophisticated...

Stone Tools Give New Insights On Early Human Migrations
2011-09-01 05:23:19

  Ancient humans made cleavers, hand axes and other advanced stone tools 300,000 years earlier than previously believed, but did not take these tools with them when they left Africa, according to a new study published this week in the journal Nature. Researchers from the United States and France traveled in 2007 to an archaeological site along the northwest shoreline of Lake Turkana in Kenya, where primitive stone flakes, two-faced blades and other large carving tools had been...

science-082411-002
2011-08-24 16:42:48

  According to a new study, the first ancestor of modern humans to master the art of cooking was homo erectus. Harvard University researchers said that the ability to cook and process food allowed homo erectus, the Neanderthals and homo sapiens to make huge evolutionary leaps that differentiated them from chimpanzees and other primates. The scientists back-up claims by previous studies that suggest homo erectus may have known how to cook.  They based their results on an...


Latest Homo erectus Reference Libraries

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

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