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Latest Homo erectus Stories

Stone Tools Give New Insights On Early Human Migrations
2011-09-01 05:23:19

  Ancient humans made cleavers, hand axes and other advanced stone tools 300,000 years earlier than previously believed, but did not take these tools with them when they left Africa, according to a new study published this week in the journal Nature. Researchers from the United States and France traveled in 2007 to an archaeological site along the northwest shoreline of Lake Turkana in Kenya, where primitive stone flakes, two-faced blades and other large carving tools had been...

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2011-08-24 16:42:48

  According to a new study, the first ancestor of modern humans to master the art of cooking was homo erectus. Harvard University researchers said that the ability to cook and process food allowed homo erectus, the Neanderthals and homo sapiens to make huge evolutionary leaps that differentiated them from chimpanzees and other primates. The scientists back-up claims by previous studies that suggest homo erectus may have known how to cook.  They based their results on an...

2011-06-30 17:13:44

Modern humans never co-existed with Homo erectus"”a finding counter to previous hypotheses of human evolution"”new excavations in Indonesia and dating analyses show. The research, reported in the journal PLoS One, offers new insights into the nature of human evolution, suggesting a different role for Homo erectus than had been previously thought. The work was conducted by the Solo River Terrace (SoRT) Project, an international group of scientists directed by anthropologists Etty...

2010-06-16 22:04:17

Almost two million years ago, early humans began eating food such as crocodiles, turtles and fish "“ a diet that could have played an important role in the evolution of human brains and our footsteps out of Africa, according to new research. In what is the first evidence of consistent amounts of aquatic foods in the human diet, an international team of researchers has discovered early stone tools and cut marked animal remains in northern Kenya. The work has just been published in the...

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2009-10-21 08:24:54

In an article published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE on October 21, 2009, Dr Thomas Plummer of Queens College at the City University of New York, Dr Richard Potts of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History and colleagues report the oldest archeological evidence of early human activities in a grassland environment, dating to 2 million years ago. The article highlights new research and its implications concerning the environments in which human...

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2009-08-03 10:31:37

Celebrity couple Ali Larter and Hayes MacArthur married in a private outdoor ceremony in Maine during the weekend, Usmagazine.com reported. Larter is an actress best known for her work on TV's Heroes. MacArthur is a comedian whose film credits include National Lampoon's Homo Erectus and The Game Plan. Usmagazine.com said the couple married at the groom's parents' home in Kennebunkport Saturday. They announced they were engaged in late 2007 after dating for five years. The marriage is the...

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2009-05-06 16:30:00

Two studies reported on Wednesday argue that the 18,000-year-old fossil remains of tiny humans found in 2003 in the remote Indonesian island of Flores are indeed a new species, and not pygmies whose brains had withered with disease. Anthropologists have bitterly debated the identity and origins of these cave-dwelling relatives since the discovery of Homo floresiensis "“ often referred to as "the hobbit" due to its small size. Measuring roughly 3 feet tall and weighing 65 pounds, the...

2009-03-16 09:48:12

U.S. and Chinese scientists say they've determined the Peking Man is thousands of years older than thought. A dating method developed by Purdue University Professor Darryl Granger not only produced a more accurate determination of the age of the Zhoukoudian, China, site of remains of Homo erectus, commonly known as Peking Man, but officials said it also suggests he somehow adapted to the cold conditions produced by a mild glacial period. The site was found to be 680,000-780,000 years old,...

2009-03-13 09:57:48

 A new dating method has found that "Peking Man" is around 200,000 years older than previously thought, suggesting he somehow adapted to the cold of a mild glacial period.A dating method developed by a Purdue University researcher allowed a more accurate determination of the age of the Zhoukoudian, China, site of remains of Homo erectus, commonly known as "Peking Man." The site was found to be 680,000-780,000 years old. Earlier estimates put the age at 230,000-500,000 years old.Darryl...

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2009-03-11 15:30:00

Chinese researchers say a new and more accurate dating method shows that Peking Man may be 200,000 years older than what experts previously thought, The Associated Press reported. The bones of the so-called Peking Man "” a batch of Homo erectus fossils found in the 1920s during cave excavations near Beijing "” were originally believed to have been some 550,000 years old. Researchers have now developed a new method that examines the radioactive decay of aluminum and beryllium in...


Latest Homo erectus Reference Libraries

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'