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A Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galápagos
2011-10-03 04:48:30

New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology untangles the evolutionary relationships between Galápagos mockingbirds and provides information about their parasites to help ensure the birds survival.


Latest Hood Mockingbird Reference Libraries

38_f005cd9cff48a707d6fc005daa835d33
2007-12-18 13:11:09

The Hood Mockingbird (Nesomimus macdonaldi), is a species of bird in the Mimidae family. It is endemic to Espanola Island in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrub land. This species has the largest bill of any of the Galapagos mockingbirds. The species will eat the eggs of seabirds nesting on the island. Photo Copyright and Credit

38_010a49cff1295b5875f4f48133d40efc
2007-12-18 13:07:30

The Tropical Mockingbird (Mimus gilvus), is a breeding bird found in southern Mexico south to northern Brazil, and in the Lesser Antilles and other Caribbean islands. The birds in Panama and Trinidad may have been introduced. This mockingbird is common in most open habitats including human habitation. Adults are 9.8 inches long and weigh 1.9 ounces. They are gray on the head and upper parts with yellow eyes, a white eye stripe and dark patch through the eye. The under parts are off-white...

38_5c6da2d7656e3a340d5c77378247c210
2007-12-18 12:59:50

The Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. The Northern Mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles. It is replaced further south by its closest living relative, the Tropical Mockingbird (Mimus gilvus). This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. Mockingbirds have a strong preference for...

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Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.