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Latest House Finch Stories

Presence Of Humans, Urban Landscapes Increase Songbirds Illness
2014-02-06 10:15:17

Arizona State University Humans living in densely populated urban areas have a profound impact not only on their physical environment, but also on the health and fitness of native wildlife. For the first time, scientists have found a direct link between the degree of urbanization and the prevalence and severity of two distinct parasites in wild house finches. The findings are published in the Feb. 4 issue of the journal PLOS ONE. A team of researchers from Arizona State University...

2013-05-29 09:42:27

Diseases can rapidly evolve to become more -- or less -- virulent, according to songbird study A novel disease in songbirds has rapidly evolved to become more harmful to its host on at least two separate occasions in just two decades, according to a new study. The research provides a real-life model to help understand how diseases that threaten humans can be expected to change in virulence as they emerge. "Everybody who's had the flu has probably wondered at some point, 'Why do I feel...

2012-02-10 10:13:36

Fast-evolving microbe lost a key chunk of its genome after jumping to new host A new study of a devastating bird disease that spread from poultry to house finches in the mid-1990s reveals that the bacteria responsible for the disease evolves at an exceptionally fast rate. What's more, the fast-evolving microbe has lost a key chunk of its genome since jumping to its new host, scientists were surprised to find. The missing portion contained the genes that made up the microbe's immune system,...

2009-12-04 15:04:24

Birds' alarm calls serve both to alert other birds to danger and to warn off predators. And some birds can pull a ventriloquist's trick, singing from the side of their mouths, according to a UC Davis study. Many animals respond vocally when they detect predators, but it's not clear to whom they are signaling, said Jessica Yorzinski, a graduate student in animal behavior at UC Davis who conducted the study with Gail Patricelli, professor of evolution and ecology. They might be warning others...

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2009-02-13 14:26:32

"What you see is what you get" often is the mantra in the highly competitive life of birds, as they use brilliant displays of color to woo females for mating. Now researchers are finding that carotenoids -- the compounds responsible for amping up red, orange, and yellow colors of birds -- also may play a role in color perception and in a bird's ability to reproduce, making it a cornerstone in birds' vitality. These are among the findings presented by Kevin McGraw, an Arizona State University...


Latest House Finch Reference Libraries

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2008-05-16 12:55:05

The Purple Finch (Carpodacus purpureus), is a member of the Rosefinch family. Their breeding habitat is coniferous and mixed forest in Canada and the northeastern United States, as well as various wooded areas along the U.S. Pacific coast. They nest on a horizontal branch or in a fork of a tree. Birds from northern Canada migrate to the southern United States. Other birds are permanent residents. Adults have a short forked brown tail and brown wings and are about 4 inches in length. Adult...

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2008-05-16 12:53:55

The Cassin's Finch (Carpodacus cassinii), is a species of finch of the Rosefinch genus. Their breeding habitat is coniferous forest in mountains of western North America as far south as northern New Mexico and Arizona. They are also found in Southern California near Baja California. They nest in a large conifer. They move to lower elevations in winter. Birds from Canada migrate south as far as central interior Mexico and the Mexican Plateau. Adults have a short forked brown tail and brown...

45_daba3466a06368594a03ba6ba9383bd1
2008-05-16 12:52:14

The House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), is a species of finch of the Rosefinch genus. Originally only a resident of Mexico and the southwestern United States, they were introduced to eastern North America in the 1940s. These birds are mainly permanent residents, though some eastern birds migrate south. Their breeding habitat is urban and suburban areas in the East as well as various semi-open areas in the West from southern Canada to northern Florida and the Mexican state of Oaxaca. The...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.