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Latest Human evolution Stories

Insights Into Primate Diversity Learned From The Rhesus Macaque
2012-06-29 09:27:37

New research published in BMC Genetics shows that the rhesus macaque has three times as much genetic variation than humans. However despite much of this extra variation being within genes, it does not affect protein function. Consequently damaging variations are at similar levels in macaques and humans - indicating a strong selection pressure to maintain gene function regardless of mutation rate or population size. Humans and rhesus macaques shared a common ancestor approximately 25...

Bonobo Genome Found Strikingly Similar To Humans And Chimps
2012-06-14 08:59:39

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com The bonobo, one of man´s closest relatives, has had its genome completely mapped by German researchers, placing a new checkmark in the DNA-sequencing list that already includes humans, chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans, giving scientists a complete record of the great ape genome. The achievement, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, should help scientists, together with the other great ape genome maps, better understand human evolution....

Homo Heidelbergensis Slightly Taller Than The Neanderthal
2012-06-06 10:04:41

The reconstruction of 27 complete human limb bones found in Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain) has helped to determine the height of various species of the Pleistocene era. Homo heilderbergensis, like Neanderthals, were similar in height to the current population of the Mediterranean. Along with its enormous quantity of fossils, one of the most important features of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) site in Atapuerca, Burgos, is the splendid state of the findings. They are so well conserved that the 27...

Infectious Diseases Determined Current Gene Makeup
2012-06-05 08:08:25

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com The author J.J. Dewey once said, "Consciousness cannot live in the present for the present cannot exist without the future and the past." This idea of the past influencing the present was seen in a recent report published in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that proposed that the inactivation of two genes linked to the immune system could have given some ancestors of modern humans greater protection from specific...

New Evidence Points To Asia As Source Of Earliest Anthropoid Primates
2012-06-04 14:15:15

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com The discovery of a new fossilized primate from Myanmar, Afrasia djijidae, illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early primates; according to a scientific paper describing the discovery that appears today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. An international research team located four teeth from the 37 million-year-old Afrasia in central Myanmar not far from their 2009 discovery of Ganlea megacania, another fossilized primate that...

Genome Data From St. Jude's Children Hospital Aids Researchers
2012-05-30 05:58:52

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Like the old slogan says, sharing is caring. St. Jude´s Children´s Hospital and the Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project recently announced that it would share its comprehensive human cancer genome data for free access by the scientific community to be used in research regarding cancer and other diseases. The release of data is the largest-ever by an organization and the amount of information more than doubles the volume of...

World's Oldest Musical Instruments Discovered
2012-05-27 04:54:32

According to a new paper published in the latest edition of the Journal of Human Evolution, researchers from Germany and the UK claim that they have identified the oldest known musical instruments on Earth. The research, conducted by experts from Oxford University and Tuebingen University, used carbon dating to discover that flutes crafted from the bones of birds and ivory from mammoth tusks were from between 42,000 and 43,000 years old, BBC News reported on Friday. The flutes, which...

New Yet Research Project To Look For DNA
2012-05-23 05:27:14

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com Wolfson College is taking a giant leap forward by attempting to discover the legendary Yeti through analyzing samples of teeth and hair. The college, which is part of Oxford University, is asking for Yeti samples so it can use the latest DNA technology to analyze the fabled beast's genome against other species in the world. "As part of a larger enquiry into the genetic relationship between our own species Homo sapiens and other hominids, we invite...

2012-05-19 00:12:17

A large survey of human genetic variation, published today in the online version of the journal Science, shows that rare genetic variants are not so rare after all and offers insights into human diseases. "I knew there would be rare variation but had no idea there would be so much of it," said the senior author of the research, John Novembre, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and of bioinformatics at UCLA. A team of life scientists studied 202 genes in 14,002...


Latest Human evolution Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

Homo sapiens
2013-09-24 13:55:52

Homo sapiens is the scientific name for the human species. Homo is the human genus, which also includes Neanderthals and various other extinct species of hominid. H. sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo. Modern humans are the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens, distinguished from their direct ancestor, Homo sapiens idaltu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens_idaltu). Subspecies of H. sapiens include Homo sapiens idaltu, roughly translated as “elder wise human” and...

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'