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Latest Human evolution Stories

Stone Tools Give New Insights On Early Human Migrations
2011-09-01 05:23:19

  Ancient humans made cleavers, hand axes and other advanced stone tools 300,000 years earlier than previously believed, but did not take these tools with them when they left Africa, according to a new study published this week in the journal Nature. Researchers from the United States and France traveled in 2007 to an archaeological site along the northwest shoreline of Lake Turkana in Kenya, where primitive stone flakes, two-faced blades and other large carving tools had been...

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2011-08-26 05:05:08

  Sexual encounters with Neanderthals produced offspring who inherited vital genes that have helped modern humans combat illness and disease, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. The scientists extracted material from the leg of a Neanderthal and the fingerbone of a Denisovan, an apparent sister species, which yielded readable DNA.  An analysis of the DNA revealed that most of us have some of the genes of these ancient humans. Indeed, the...

science-082411-002
2011-08-24 16:42:48

  According to a new study, the first ancestor of modern humans to master the art of cooking was homo erectus. Harvard University researchers said that the ability to cook and process food allowed homo erectus, the Neanderthals and homo sapiens to make huge evolutionary leaps that differentiated them from chimpanzees and other primates. The scientists back-up claims by previous studies that suggest homo erectus may have known how to cook.  They based their results on an...

sciencepress-082411-001
2011-08-24 11:21:58

  An international team of researchers has used ancient DNA to produce compelling evidence that the lack of genetic diversity in modern stallions is the result of the domestication process. The team, which was led by Professor Michi Hofreiter from the University of York, UK, has carried out the first study on Y chromosomal DNA sequences from extinct ancient wild horses and found an abundance of diversity. The results, which are published in Nature Communications, suggest the...

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2011-08-22 12:44:20

A Stanford University scientist is claiming that interbreeding between human ancestors and Neanderthals that took place between 65,000 and 90,000 years ago may have helped our kind survive and gain evolutionary dominance. According to Peter Parham, an immunology expert at the California university's medical school, crossbreeding between the two species "provided humans with a ready-mixed cocktail of disease-resistant genes when the species first ventured out of its native Africa," Graeme...

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2011-08-04 13:22:04

Scientists report they have found that savannas prevailed most of East African sites where human ancestors and their ape relatives evolved for the past 6 million years. The University of Utah scientists used chemical isotopes in ancient soil to measure prehistoric tree cover in order to make this discovery. "We've been able to quantify how much shade was available in the geological past," geochemist Thure Cerling, senior author of a study of the new method in the Thursday, Aug. 4, 2011...

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2011-07-29 07:35:00

The 300,000 year reign of the Neanderthals most likely came to an end because of simple numbers, as modern humans outnumbered their predecessors by a 10-to-1 margin, researchers from Cambridge University claim in a new study. Once the hoards of homo sapiens poured into Western Europe, they overwhelmed Neanderthals, effectively making them "a minority in their own land," Guardian Science Correspondent Ian Sample wrote on Thursday. The sheer numbers of these new residents quickly ended the...

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2011-07-26 06:10:00

The role of grandparents in helping to nurture children dates back some 30,000 years, when the life expectancy of the human population began to increase significantly, a team of American anthropologists claim in a new study. In fact, according to David Derbyshire of the Daily Mail, as the number of people reaching advanced age began to rise, the researchers discovered that the "older generation" could have "played a key role in the evolution of mankind." "With older people able to look after...

2011-07-25 13:30:58

UCLA life scientists and colleagues have produced one of the first high-resolution genetic maps for African American populations. A genetic map reveals the precise locations across the genome where DNA from a person's father and mother have been stitched together through a biological process called "recombination." This process results in new genetic combinations that are then passed on to the person's children. The new map will help disease geneticists working to map genetic diseases in...

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2011-07-20 13:25:00

Scientists at the University of Liverpool discovered ancient footprints that show human-like features of the feet and gait existed two million years earlier than previously thought. Earlier studies suggested that the characteristics of the human foot, such as the ability to walk upright, emerged in early Homo, which was about 1.9 million years ago. However, the Liverpool researchers have shown that footprints of a human ancestor dating back 3.7 million years ago show features of the foot...


Latest Human evolution Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

Homo sapiens
2013-09-24 13:55:52

Homo sapiens is the scientific name for the human species. Homo is the human genus, which also includes Neanderthals and various other extinct species of hominid. H. sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo. Modern humans are the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens, distinguished from their direct ancestor, Homo sapiens idaltu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens_idaltu). Subspecies of H. sapiens include Homo sapiens idaltu, roughly translated as “elder wise human” and...

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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