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Latest Human evolution Stories

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2011-05-11 06:35:00

Researchers have new evidence that suggest Neanderthals died out much earlier than previously thought, and possibly before modern humans arrived. Carbon-dated Neanderthal remains from a cave in the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains in Russia were found to be 10,000 years older than previous research had suggested. The new evidence contradicts the popular theory that Neanderthals and modern humans interacted for thousands of years before the archaic species became extinct. Instead, the...

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2011-05-03 06:00:00

New research finds that the ancient pre-human known as "Nutcracker Man" did not dine on nuts after all, but instead dined on large quantities of grasses and sedges -- a discovery that upsets conventional wisdom about the diet of early humans. "It most likely was eating grass, and most definitely was not cracking nuts," said University of Utah geochemist Thure Cerling, lead author of the study. The "Nutcracker Man", or Paranthropus boisei, is an ancient human relative that roamed the African...

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2011-04-18 10:20:00

What was really on the menus of our ancestors? For human ancestors, eating could be hard work. "Our ancestors were large creatures. With very low quality foods, without cooked foods, it's very likely that they would have spent a great deal more of their day eating than we do," says Peter Ungar, distinguished professor and chairman of anthropology at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Ungar's work, understanding ancient diets, is a combination of anthropology, biology, engineering,...

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2011-03-21 07:06:20

Experiment stresses consequences of placing newly discovered fossils on human family tree Someday a future intelligent organism could sweep away a million years of dust and find the bones of a Homo sapiens and wonder what he was. Further research would show Homo sapiens walked upright, lived in communities and buried their dead. But this future intelligent organism might be faced with an old puzzle--determining where Homo sapiens came from. "If their cognitive world induced them to ask the...

652b5a6273b38a52cffd6576e02e8a541
2011-03-15 04:00:00

A new study shows clear evidence that our ancient human ancestors in Europe learned to control fire -- one of the most important milestones on the path to civilization -- some 400,000 years ago. The findings are another indication that Neanderthals weren't simply dimwitted brutes, as often portrayed, and were in fact able to thrive in Europe's northern latitudes without the use of fire.  The researchers suggested that a highly active lifestyle, along with a diet high in protein, might...

2011-03-10 23:20:09

One of the most complex human mysteries involves how and why we became an outlier species in terms of biological success. Research findings published in the March 11 edition of the journal Science by an international team of noted anthropologists, including several from Arizona State University, who study hunter-gatherer societies, are informing the issue by suggesting that human ancestral social structure may be the root of cumulative culture and cooperation and, ultimately, human...

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2011-03-10 06:05:00

Scientists have analyzed the genomes of humans and closely related primates and discovered over 500 regulatory regions that chimpanzees and mammals have that humans do not.  Gill Bejerano, a biologist at Stanford University School of Medicine, and colleagues found that humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of human brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. "Rather than looking for species-specific differences in specific...

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2011-03-08 08:30:00

Modern man may have evolved from the bushmen of Southern Africa, not from the eastern part of the continent as many experts suggest, claims a new study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). A team of experts from Stanford University, Santa Clara University, the University of California, Brown University, Cornell University, the Yale University School of Medicine, the Institute of Evolutionary Biology at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Spain,...

2011-03-03 12:55:33

Scientists find link between tectonically active landscapes and ancient sites Our earliest ancestors preferred to settle in locations that have something in common with cities such as San Francisco, Naples and Istanbul "“ they are often on active tectonic faults in areas that have an earthquake risk or volcanoes, or both. An international team of scientists has established a link between the shape of the landscape and the habitats preferred by our earliest ancestors. The research, by...

2011-02-17 21:30:38

Dominant model of human adaptation may have played smaller role than thought The most popular model used by geneticists for the last 35 years to detect the footprints of human evolution may overlook more common subtle changes, a new international study finds. Classic selective sweeps, when a beneficial genetic mutation quickly spreads through the human population, are thought to have been the primary driver of human evolution. But a new computational analysis, published in the February 18,...


Latest Human evolution Reference Libraries

Australopithecus garhi
2013-11-29 11:38:51

Australopithecus garhi is a gracile australopithecine species whose fossils were discovered in 1996 by a research team led by Ethiopian paleontologist Berhane Asfaw ad Tim White, an American paleontologist. The remains are believed to be a human ancestor species and most likely the direct ancestor to the human genus Homo. Tim White was the scientist to find the first of the key A. garhi fossils in 1996 within the Bouri Formation found in the Middle Awash of Ethiopia’s Afar Depression....

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

Homo sapiens
2013-09-24 13:55:52

Homo sapiens is the scientific name for the human species. Homo is the human genus, which also includes Neanderthals and various other extinct species of hominid. H. sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo. Modern humans are the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens, distinguished from their direct ancestor, Homo sapiens idaltu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens_idaltu). Subspecies of H. sapiens include Homo sapiens idaltu, roughly translated as “elder wise human” and...

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

Homo floresiensis
2013-09-16 13:06:40

Homo floresiensis Homo floresiensis, or Flores Man, nicknamed “hobbit” and “Flow”, is an extinct species in the genus Homo. The remains of an individual that would have stood about 3 feet in height were uncovered in 2003 on the island of Flores in Indonesia. Incomplete skeletons of nine individuals have been recovered, including one complete cranium. These remains have been the focus of intense research to establish whether they represent a species distinctive from modern humans....

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.