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Latest Human Stories

2012-03-22 10:59:41

Studies in monkeys are unlikely to provide reliable evidence for links between social status and heart disease in humans Studies in monkeys are unlikely to provide reliable evidence for links between social status and heart disease in humans, according to the first ever systematic review of the relevant research. The study, published in PLoS ONE, concludes that although such studies are cited frequently in human health research the evidence is often "cherry picked" and generalisation of...

Research Confirms Menopause Causes Memory Problems
2012-03-17 03:58:01

According to research published in the journal Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society, women really do suffer memory problems when going through menopause. Millions of women going through menopause have complained about forgetfulness or described having "brain fog" in their late 40s and 50s. In a new study, researchers gave women various cognitive tests to validate their experiences and provide some clues to what is happening in the brain as menopause hit....

Nearby Chimpanzee Populations Show Greater Genetic Diversity Than Distant Human Populations
2012-03-03 05:27:54

Chimpanzee populations living in relatively close proximity are substantially more different genetically than humans living on different continents, according to a study published March 2 in PLoS Genetics. The study suggests that genomics can provide a valuable new tool for use in chimpanzee conservation, with the potential to identify the population of origin of an individual chimpanzee or the provenance of a sample of bush meat. Common chimpanzees in equatorial Africa have long been...

2012-03-02 12:32:29

Chimpanzee populations living in close proximity are substantially more different genetically than humans living on different continents Chimpanzee populations living in close proximity are substantially more different genetically than humans living on different continents, according to a study published in PLoS Genetics. Research conducted by scientists from the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, and the Biomedical Primate Research Centre suggests that...

2012-02-10 12:10:49

Underserved youth athletes report more life skill and character development when their coaches place greater emphasis on creating caring climates instead of focusing on competition, according to research from Michigan State University's Institute for the Study of Youth Sports. Playing in an atmosphere that focuses on player self-improvement versus player competition creates a sense of teamwork and develops initiative, social skills and a sense of identity, report the authors of the study...

Genetic Mixing, Not Extinction, Led To Neanderthals' Demise
2012-02-08 06:07:35

Rather than being physically wiped out, a new study suggests that Neanderthals were likely integrated into the gene pool of early humans after the two groups crossed paths and began interbreeding. The new study, published in the journal Advances in Complex Systems (ACS), was written by C. Michael Barton of Arizona State University (ASU) and Julien Riel-Salvatore of the University of Colorado Denver, and "builds on work published last year in the journal Human Ecology and on recent genetic...

2012-02-02 07:44:24

Over the first few years of life, human cognition continues to develop, soaking up information and experiences from the environment and far surpassing the abilities of even our nearest primate relatives. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers have identified extended synaptic development in the human brain relative to other primates, a finding that sheds new light on the biology and evolution of human cognition. "Why can we absorb environmental information during...

2012-01-26 11:45:37

A new study, using genetic analysis to look for clues about human migration over sixty thousand years ago, suggests that the first modern humans settled in Arabia on their way from the Horn of Africa to the rest of the world. Led by the University of Leeds and the University of Porto in Portugal, the study is published today in American Journal of Human Genetics and provides intriguing insight into the earliest stages of modern human migration, say the researchers. "A major unanswered...

2012-01-26 11:39:10

The timing and pattern of the migration of early modern humans has been a source of much debate and research. Now, a new study uses genetic analysis to look for clues about the migration of the first modern humans who moved out of Africa more than 60,000 years ago. The research, published January 26 by Cell Press in the American Journal of Human Genetics, the official journal of the American Society of Human Genetics, provides intriguing insight into the earliest stages of human migration and...

2012-01-24 21:46:30

Numerous infant studies indicate environmental knowledge is present soon after birth While it may appear that infants are helpless creatures that only blink, eat, cry and sleep, one University of Missouri researcher says that studies indicate infant brains come equipped with knowledge of “intuitive physics.” “In the MU Developmental Cognition Lab, we study infant knowledge of the world by measuring a child´s gaze when presented with different scenarios,”...


Latest Human Reference Libraries

Homo sapiens
2013-09-24 13:55:52

Homo sapiens is the scientific name for the human species. Homo is the human genus, which also includes Neanderthals and various other extinct species of hominid. H. sapiens is the only surviving species of the genus Homo. Modern humans are the subspecies Homo sapiens sapiens, distinguished from their direct ancestor, Homo sapiens idaltu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homo_sapiens_idaltu). Subspecies of H. sapiens include Homo sapiens idaltu, roughly translated as “elder wise human” and...

0_fb61d1b290cba03d06f46aa5e2278549
2007-01-02 11:08:06

The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), also known as the robust chimpanzee, is a great ape. Basic facts Common chimpanzees are found in the tropical forests and wet savannas of Western and Central Africa. They once inhabited most of this region, but their habitat has been dramatically reduced in recent years. Adults in the wild weigh between 88 and 143 lbs (40 and 65 kg). Males can measure up to 63 inches (160 cm) and females up to 51 inches (130 cm). They are lighter than humans...

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