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Latest Hunter-gatherer Stories

2010-04-02 11:40:00

The hunter-gatherers who inhabited the southern coast of Scandinavia 4,000 years ago were lactose intolerant. This has been shown by a new study carried out by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University. The study, which has been published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, supports the researchers' earlier conclusion that today's Scandinavians are not descended from the Stone Age people in question but from a group that arrived later. "This group of hunter-gatherers...

2010-01-19 21:11:03

Study led by University of Leicester published in PLoS Biology A new study from the University of Leicester has found that most men in Europe descend from the first farmers who migrated from the Near East 10,000 years ago. The findings are published January 19 in the open-access journal PLoS Biology. The invention of farming is perhaps the most important cultural change in the history of modern humans. Increased food production led to the development of societies that stayed put, rather than...

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2009-10-30 11:15:36

Researchers ponder whether Internet will produce more financially equal societies A new study reveals the important role inherited wealth plays in sustaining economic inequality in small scale societies. A team of 26 anthropologists, statisticians, and economists based at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico amassed an unprecedented data set allowing 43 estimates of a family's wealth inheritance and found that financial inequality among populations largely depends on the "technologies" that...

2009-09-29 10:42:45

A team of Swedish, Danish and British researchers says it used DNA to determine today's Scandinavians are descended from Stone Age immigrants. The researchers said their findings that involve both genetics and archaeology contradict the theory that Scandinavians are descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age. The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago had a different gene pool than ours, said Uppsala University...

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2009-09-25 04:50:00

Today's Scandinavians are not descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age but, apparently, from a population that arrived later, concurrently with the introduction of agriculture. This is one conclusion of a new study straddling the borderline between genetics and archaeology, which involved Swedish researchers and which has now been published in the journal Current Biology. "The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago...

2009-09-04 13:00:24

The ancestors of modern-day Europeans likely were farmers and not hunter-gatherers, British researchers said. DNA analysis taken from burial grounds suggests early farmers migrated into Europe with plants and domesticated animals and replaced Stone Age hunter-gatherers, geneticist Mark Thomas of University College London said in a release Friday. There is little evidence of a genetic link between the hunter-gatherers and the early farmers, said Thomas, who worked with researchers at Germany's...

2009-09-03 23:30:00

Analysis of ancient DNA from skeletons suggests that Europe's first farmers were not the descendants of the people who settled the area after the retreat of the ice sheets. Instead, the early farmers probably migrated into major areas of central and eastern Europe about 7,500 years ago, bringing domesticated plants and animals with them, says Barbara Bramanti from Mainz University in Germany and colleagues. The researchers analyzed DNA from hunter-gatherer and early farmer burials, and...

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2009-07-30 11:35:00

A British study reported Thursday that men are better at seeing things in the distance because of their hunter-gatherer past of chasing animals, while women are better at finding things at a close range. The researchers said that the findings show how the brains of men and women have evolved over thousands of years, discovering that men are better at judging faraway targets. Researchers asked a group of 48 men and women to test their theory by using a laser pointer to mark the midpoint of...

2009-04-15 14:33:08

A new theory about early human adaptation suggests that our ancestors capitalized on their capacities for play to enable the development of a highly cooperative way of life. Writing in the current edition of the interdisciplinary American Journal of Play, Boston College developmental psychologist Peter Gray suggests that use of play helped early humans to overcome the innate tendencies toward aggression and dominance which would have made a cooperative society impossible. "Play and humor were...

2008-12-22 09:34:13

Modern humans left Africa over 60,000 years ago in a migration that many believe was responsible for nearly all of the human population that exist outside Africa today. Now, researchers have revealed that men and women weren't equal partners in that exodus. By tracing variations in the X chromosome and in the non-sex chromosomes, the researchers found evidence that men probably outnumbered women in that migration. The scientists expect that their method of comparing X chromosomes with the...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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