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Latest Hunter-gatherers Stories

2010-05-03 14:51:04

Results should be interpreted with caution says researcher New research shows Inuit populations in the Canadian Arctic have asthma rates far below Aboriginal people in other parts of Canada, especially those in urban centers. The study, published recently in the International Journal of Circumpolar Health, says reported cases of asthma in Inuit children was 5%, compared to 12% for all other Aboriginal groups. In Inuit adults, 5.4% of respondents had been diagnosed with asthma, compared to the...

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2010-04-08 11:25:50

Using skills passed down through generations, Inuit forecasters living in the Canadian Arctic look to the sky to tell by the way the wind scatters a cloud whether a storm is on the horizon or if it's safe to go on a hunt. Thousands of miles away in a lab tucked in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, scientists take data measurements and use the latest computer models to predict weather. They are two practices serving the same purpose that come from disparate worlds. But in the past 20 years,...

2010-01-25 14:57:58

The fetal and infant mortality rate for women in Inuit-inhabited areas of Canada was 2.7 times higher than in the rest of Canada, and women had higher rates of preterm birth, found an article (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj082042.pdf in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca. The study looked at all births between 1990 and 2000. There was a higher proportion of mothers under the age of 20 in Inuit-inhabited regions (22%) compared with the rest of...

2010-01-25 14:56:49

Seventy percent of Inuit preschoolers in Nunavut, Canada's largest territory, live in households where there isn't enough food, a situation with implications for children's academic and psychosocial development, found an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj091297.pdf. The study, conducted by researchers at McGill University and the Government of Nunavut, looked at 388 Inuit children aged 3-5 years in 16 communities from...

2009-10-14 21:50:00

TORONTO, Oct. 14 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ - Noront Resources Ltd. ("Noront" or the "Company") (TSX Venture: NOT) The Company is pleased to announce that it has formed a historic First Nations Advisory Council to guide the Company in establishing exemplary relationships with the local First Nations Communities in the Ring of Fire, in the James Bay Lowlands, where the Company's primary assets, including the Eagle's Nest and the Blackbird Deposits, are located. Wes Hanson, Noront's Chief Executive...

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2009-09-11 13:20:00

Rapid change is underway in the Arctic due to the effects of climate change, researchers reported on Thursday. "The Arctic as we know it may soon be a thing of the past," said Eric Post, associate professor of biology at Penn State University, whose study is published in Friday's edition of the journal Science. Post lead an international team in a broad study of the ecological changes occurring in the Arctic during the fourth International Polar Year, which ended in 2008. Researchers analyzed...

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2009-06-18 14:41:07

Queen's researchers combine Inuit skills, DNA analysis in integrated method A new approach to tracking polar bears, developed by Queen's University researchers, will shed more light on the potentially endangered Arctic animal and help boost the economy of Canada's north. Integrating the traditional knowledge of Inuit hunters with state-of-the-art genetic DNA analysis, a three-part method developed by biologists Peter V.C. de Groot and Peter Boag, is cheaper and much easier on the bears than...

2009-05-28 12:02:40

For one international community "“ the 165,000 strong Inuit community dispersed across the Arctic coastline in small, remote coastal settlements in Alaska, Canada, Greenland and Siberia "“ it is already too late to prevent some of the negative effects of climate change.James D. Ford from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, is today, Thursday, 28 May, presenting a paper published in IOP Publishing's Environmental Research Letters, "Dangerous climate change and the importance of...

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2009-05-27 13:09:07

Canada's governor ate a piece of a raw seal's heart after it was slaughtered during her official Arctic trip to show solidarity with embattled Inuit seal hunters. Many Inuit people gathered for a feast in Rankin Inlet in Nunavut, which was the first stop on Governor General Michaelle Jean's trip this week to different remote northern communities as Canada's head of state and representative of Queen Elizabeth II. Jean stood over the carcass of a freshly slaughtered seal and used a traditional...

2009-05-22 19:02:25

Public health interventions and an enhanced immunization program could improve health for Inuit children and lower healthcare costs, Canadian researchers say. Dr. Anna Banerji, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, said respiratory infections are the leading cause for admission, medical evacuation and expenditure for Inuit children in the healthcare system and can result in serious health complications for those affected. Infants of Inuit race were...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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