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Latest Hydrogen production Stories

2012-07-11 05:49:26

Some of the planet´s tiniest inhabitants may help address two of society´s biggest environmental challenges:  how to deal with the vast quantities of organic waste produced and where to find clean, renewable energy. According to César Torres and Sudeep Popat, researchers at Arizona State University´s Biodesign Institute, certain kinds of bacteria are adept at converting waste into useful energy.  These microorganisms are presently being applied to the...

2012-07-11 05:40:34

A new biofuel production process created by Michigan State University researchers produces energy more than 20 times higher than existing methods. The results, published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology, showcase a novel way to use microbes to produce biofuel and hydrogen, all while consuming agricultural wastes. Gemma Reguera, MSU microbiologist, has developed bioelectrochemical systems known as microbial electrolysis cells, or MECs, using bacteria to...

2012-07-04 23:00:19

ScienceAlerts.com is a new social network featuring the latest information in the basic and applied sciences of biology, agriculture, environment, forestry, geography and health. The members of this new website monitor 4,868 journals publishing in these fields and alert visitors in real-time through topic-specific site content and RSS feeds. The latest addition to this website is the Environmental Sciences Category with more than 27,000 articles selected from over 150 scientific environment...

2012-06-22 12:05:07

New catalyst dramatically cheaper without sacrificing performance Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) have identified a catalyst that provides the same level of efficiency in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as the currently used platinum catalyst, but at 5% of the cost. Since more than 60% of the investment in making microbial fuel cells is the cost of platinum, the discovery may lead to much more affordable energy conversion and storage devices. The material —...

2012-06-19 00:01:10

Findings may lead to new ways to produce raw materials for renewable fuels in microscopic “green factories” Overturning two long-held misconceptions about oil production in algae, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy´s Brookhaven National Laboratory show that ramping up the microbes´ overall metabolism by feeding them more carbon increases oil production as the organisms continue to grow. The findings – published online in the journal Plant and Cell...

2012-04-25 22:08:05

CU Denver team develops process resulting in 70 times more energy A team of scientists from University of Colorado Denver has developed a novel energy system that increases the amount of energy harvested from microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by more than 70 times. The new approach also greatly improves energy efficiency. MFCs are emerging as a way to use bacteria to directly harvest electricity from biodegradable materials, such as wastewater or marine sediments The energy from a single MFC...

2012-03-27 08:33:09

Butterfly wings may rank among the most delicate structures in nature, but they have given researchers powerful inspiration for new technology that doubles production of hydrogen gas – a green fuel of the future – from water and sunlight. The researchers presented their findings here today at the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 243rd National Meeting & Exposition. Tongxiang Fan, Ph.D., who reported on the use of two swallowtail butterflies – Troides aeacus...

2012-03-26 13:39:30

The long-sought technology for enabling the fabled "hydrogen economy" – an era based on hydrogen fuel that replaces gasoline, diesel and other fossil fuels, easing concerns about foreign oil and air pollution – has been available for decades and could begin commercial production of hydrogen in this decade, a scientist reported here today. Speaking at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society,...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.