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Latest Hydrogen sulfide Stories

Mystery Of Marine Methane Oxidation Unraveled
2012-11-12 13:27:20

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Researchers uncover how microorganisms on the ocean floor protect the atmosphere against methane Microbiologists and geochemists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, along with their colleagues from Vienna and Mainz, show that marine methane oxidation coupled to sulfate respiration can be performed by a single microorganism, a member of the ancient kingdom of the Archaea, and does not need to be carried out in collaboration with a bacterium, as...

2012-10-26 00:37:11

Multicellular bacteria transmit electrons across relatively enormous distances A multinational research team has discovered filamentous bacteria that function as living power cables in order to transmit electrons thousands of cell lengths away. The Desulfobulbus bacterial cells, which are only a few thousandths of a millimeter long each, are so tiny that they are invisible to the naked eye. And yet, under the right circumstances, they form a multicellular filament that can transmit...

Researchers Use Noxious Gas To Convert Stem Cells To Liver Cells
2012-02-27 12:42:30

Japanese scientists have recently discovered that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) — the chemical responsible for such malodorous phenomena as human flatulence, bad breath and rotten eggs — can be used to efficiently convert stem cells from human teeth into liver cells. While the fetid chemical compound is produced in small quantities by the human body for use in a variety of biological signaling mechanisms, at high concentrations it is highly poisonous and extremely flammable. A team...

2012-02-21 23:10:56

Discovery is designed to allow inexpensive detection of poisonous industrial gases by workers wearing small sensor chips filled with gold nanowires Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have coaxed gold into nanowires as a way of creating an inexpensive material for detecting poisonous gases found in natural gas. Along with colleagues at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Alexander Star, associate professor of chemistry in Pitt's Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and...

Carbonized Coffee Grounds Remove Foul Smells
2012-02-09 04:18:45

Scientists at The City College of New York Report Nitrogen Contained in Caffeine Enhances Odor-Adsorbing Properties of Carbons For coffee lovers, the first cup of the morning is one of life´s best aromas. But did you know that the leftover grounds could eliminate one of the worst smells around — sewer gas? In research to develop a novel, eco-friendly filter to remove toxic gases from the air, scientists at The City College of New York (CCNY) found that a material made from...

2012-01-03 22:14:34

Finding lays basis for studies in animal models of diabetic kidney disease Hydrogen sulfide, a gas notorious for its rotten-egg smell, may have redeeming qualities after all. It reduces high glucose-induced production of scarring proteins in kidney cells, researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. The paper is scheduled for print publication in early 2012. “There is interest in gases being mediators of...

2011-12-04 08:00:00

As reported by Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin, a new study has found that a component of garlic oil may help release protective compounds to the heart after a heart attack, during cardiac surgery, or as a treatment for heart failure. This study was recently reported by Doctors Health Press, a publisher of various natural health newsletters books and reports, including the popular online Doctors Health Press e-Bulletin. Boston, MA (PRWEB) December 04, 2011 As reported by Doctors Health...

2011-11-18 03:37:35

Researchers discover role of H2S as defense mechanism against oxidative stress and antibiotics Although scientists have known for centuries that many bacteria produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) it was thought to be simply a toxic by-product of cellular activity. Now, researchers at NYU School of Medicine have discovered H2S in fact plays a major role in protecting bacteria from the effects of numerous different antibiotics. In the study led by Evgeny Nudler, PhD, the Julie Wilson Anderson...

2011-11-16 09:38:57

A component of garlic oil may help release protective compounds to the heart after heart attack, during cardiac surgery, or as a treatment for heart failure. At low concentrations, hydrogen sulfide gas has been found to protect the heart from damage. However, this unstable and volatile compound has been difficult to deliver as therapy. Now researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have turned to diallyl trisulfide, a garlic oil component, as a way to deliver the benefits of...

2011-10-04 19:15:00

Anti-microbial concrete additive in Jensen Precast BioConcreteâ“ž¢ stops bacteria growth that leads to microbial induced corrosion (MIC) in concrete wastewater systems. Watch the video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVZjzQcH0ik Sparks, NV (PRWEB) October 04, 2011 Armour® introduced Dial antibacterial soap in 1948. Burlington® developed BioGuard® socks in 1976. For more than 60 years people have been surrounded by antimicrobial products. From spray...


Latest Hydrogen sulfide Reference Libraries

0_ad99fed827882160f5c8221dfda576f1
2005-05-25 17:01:27

Sulfur (or Sulphur; see spelling below) is the chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol S and atomic number 16. It is an abundant, tasteless, odorless, multivalent non-metal. Sulfur, in its native form, is a yellow crystaline solid. In nature, it can be found as the pure element or as sulfide and sulfate minerals. It is an essential element for life and is found in several amino acids. Its commercial uses are primarily in fertilizers but it is also widely used in gunpowder,...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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