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Latest Hydrogen sulfide Stories

2008-07-07 12:00:48

U.S. scientists say they've found a tiny amount of inhaled or intravenous hydrogen sulfide greatly improves the survival of rats with extreme blood loss. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center researchers said they used hydrogen sulfide to induce a state of reversible metabolic hibernation as a way to reduce death from insufficient blood supply to organs and tissues in a rat model of lethal hemorrhage. The study determined 75 percent of rats given inhaled hydrogen sulfide and 67 percent...

2008-07-01 15:00:54

SEATTLE, July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that the administration of minute amounts of inhaled or intravenous hydrogen sulfide, or H2S -- the molecule that gives rotten eggs their sulfurous stench -- significantly improves survival from extreme blood loss in rats. Cell biologist Mark B. Roth, Ph.D., and colleagues in the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, in collaboration with surgeon Robert K. Winn, Ph.D., and...

2008-06-21 15:00:30

By Keith Gushard, The Meadville Tribune, Pa. Jun. 21--The headaches were deja vu for Rich Dodge. "I came home from work and started not feeling good again," Dodge said Friday night as he stood outside his Lord Street residence. The mysterious rotten egg stench was back. Dodge was one of dozens of Meadville residents affected Friday night by the stench -- hydrogen sulfide -- swirling out of sanitary sewers in the area bounded by Baldwin, Terrace and Spring streets and Glenwood...

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2008-06-21 06:00:00

A large dairy in northwestern Minnesota with odors severe enough to drive nearby residents from their homes last week now faces legal problems. State Attorney General Lori Swanson and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) jointly sued Excel Dairy on Friday, charging that the 1,500-cow operation just north of Thief River Falls has repeatedly violated air quality standards, environmental protection laws and feedlot operating permits. State health officials advised several neighbors of...

2008-03-26 23:34:47

Science fiction usually sticks hibernating spaceflyers in glowing capsules of goo, but a real-life ingredient for suspended animation may not be too far off, scientists say. Hydrogen sulfide is the key stinky compound in rotting eggs and swamp gas. New research shows it can slow down a mouse's metabolism, or the consumption of oxygen, without dampening the flow of blood. "A little hydrogen sulfide gas is a way to reversibly and, apparently, safely cut metabolism in mice,"...

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2008-03-25 11:20:00

Heart rate and metabolism drop, while blood pressure and oxygen levels maintainedLow doses of the toxic gas responsible for the unpleasant odor of rotten eggs can safely and reversibly depress both metabolism and aspects of cardiovascular function in mice, producing a suspended-animation-like state. In the April 2008 issue of the journal Anesthesiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report that effects seen in earlier studies of hydrogen sulfide do not depend on a reduction...

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2007-10-31 08:35:00

The Great Dying 250 million years ago happened slowly, according to USC geologists USC -- The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history also may have been one of the slowest, according to a study that casts further doubt on the extinction-by-meteor theory. Creeping environmental stress fueled by volcanic eruptions and global warming was the likely cause of the Great Dying 250 million years ago, said USC doctoral student Catherine Powers. Writing in the November issue of the journal...

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2006-09-11 12:30:00

This summer, a science team set out on a two-week expedition of Earth's own little version of Jupiter's moon Europa -- the Borup Fiord Pass at Ellesmere Island, a place hidden high above the rest of the world in the Canadian High Arctic. The team, headed by Canadian geologists Drs. Stephen Grasby and Benoit Beauchamp, included Dahmnait Gleeson, a grad student who works under JPL scientist and Europa specialist Dr. Bob Pappalardo. Ellesmere Island's sulfur-rich springs leave large, telltale...

2005-11-07 14:40:42

CHAPEL HILL -- Sustained elevation of the suicide rate in a North Carolina county may be linked to releases of hydrogen sulfide and other airborne chemicals from a nearby paper mill and possibly other industrial sites, a new study led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill psychiatrist indicates. The findings are being presented today (Nov. 7) to the 18th Annual U.S. Psychiatric and Mental Health Congress in Las Vegas. This is the second study to propose a possible link between...

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2005-10-07 07:35:00

NASA -- NASA exobiology researchers confirmed Earth's oceans were once rich in sulfides that would prevent advanced life forms, such as fish and mammals, from thriving. The research was funded in part by NASA's exobiology program. A team of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, working with colleagues from Australia and the United Kingdom, analyzed the fossilized remains of photosynthetic pigments preserved in 1.6 billion-year-old rocks from the...


Latest Hydrogen sulfide Reference Libraries

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2005-05-25 17:01:27

Sulfur (or Sulphur; see spelling below) is the chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol S and atomic number 16. It is an abundant, tasteless, odorless, multivalent non-metal. Sulfur, in its native form, is a yellow crystaline solid. In nature, it can be found as the pure element or as sulfide and sulfate minerals. It is an essential element for life and is found in several amino acids. Its commercial uses are primarily in fertilizers but it is also widely used in gunpowder,...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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