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Latest Hydrogen Stories

2013-10-17 23:32:16

The broadening of quantum chemistry known as hadronic chemistry, and its applications to new clean burning fuels, such as Santilli MagneHydrogen and Hy-Fuels, will be studied at the international

2013-10-16 09:08:08

Scientists at Rice University are enhancing the natural antioxidant properties of an element found in a car’s catalytic converter to make it useful for medical applications.

Sun And Sewage Harnessed To Produce Hydrogen Fuel Using New Device
2013-10-11 12:03:49

A novel device that uses only sunlight and wastewater to produce hydrogen gas could provide a sustainable energy source while improving the efficiency of wastewater treatment.

2013-10-10 23:26:58

Santilli's new chemical species of Hydrogen with a multiple of the specific weight of conventional Hydrogen, called MagneHydrogen, has been confirmed by the participants of the recent ICNAAM

2013-10-10 23:26:55

The new chemical species of Santilli MagneCules and their applications were confirmed by the participants of the recent ICNAAM Conference in Greece.

2013-09-16 23:21:48

Interscan Corporation, a leading manufacturer of toxic gas detection systems, is pleased to announce that its popular Gas Detection Knowledge Base has surpassed 400,000 visits. Simi


Latest Hydrogen Reference Libraries

0_e7c2d180a7922129e99a5d11f5b9c75f
2009-07-09 17:47:41

Astatine is a radioactive chemical element. The symbol for Astatine is At and its atomic number is 85. Astatine is the heaviest halogen discovered. It was first produced by Dale R. Corson, Kenneth Ross Mackenzie, and Emilio Segrè in 1940. Although astatine is produced by radioactive decay in nature, it is typically found only in miniscule amounts due to its short half-life (the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a given radioactive substance to decay or disintegrate). Trace amounts...

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Word of the Day
megalophonous
  • Having a loud voice; vociferous; clamorous.
  • Of grand or imposing sound.
The word 'megalophonous' comes from Greek roots meaning 'big' and 'sound'.