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Latest Hydrophobe Stories

2012-07-30 15:44:41

Inspired by the water-repellent properties of the lotus leaf, a group of scientists in China has discovered a way to impart a fog-free, self-cleaning finish to glass and other transparent materials. "Superhydrophobic" surfaces, such as the lotus leaf, are excellent at repelling water and also boast other "smart" self-cleaning, anti-glare, anti-icing, and anti-corrosion properties. By using hollow silica nanoparticles that resemble raspberries, scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences...

2012-06-18 10:41:42

The water boatman's unique propulsion system was studied by researchers from China Superhydrophobicity is one of most important interfacial properties between solids and liquids. SHI Yanlong and his group from the College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key laboratory of Hexi Corridor Resources Utilization of Gansu Universities, Hexi University investigated the superhydrophobicity of the water boatman's hind wings. The study showed that superhydrophobicity plays a crucial role in...

2012-06-16 00:47:22

For many years, scientists have been pursuing ways to mimic the perplexing capability of the lotus leaf to repel water. Lotus leaves hate water so much that droplets effortlessly roll off the surface, keeping it clean from dirt. Now an international team of researchers led by Aalto University have come up with an entirely new concept of writing and displaying information on surfaces using simply water. They exploit the unique way a trapped layer of air behaves on a lotus-inspired...

2012-05-03 09:03:33

Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of the first self-propelled "microsubmarines" designed to pick up droplets of oil from contaminated waters and transport them to collection facilities. The report concludes that these tiny machines could play an important role in cleaning up oil spills, like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico. It appears in the journal ACS Nano. Joseph Wang and colleagues explain that different versions of microengines have...

2012-02-24 18:00:48

Researchers at the universities of Granada and Barcelona have described for the first time the diffusion of liquid water through nanochannels in molecular terms; nanochannels are extremely tiny channels with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers that scientists use to study the behavior of molecules (nm. a unit of length in the metric system equal to one billionth of a meter that is used in the field of nanotechnology). This study might have an important impact on water desalinization and...

2012-01-27 12:17:59

According to a recent study, there is a new mechanism of drug release using 3D superhydrophobic materials that utilizes air as a removable barrier to control the rate at which drug is released. The study was electronically published on January 16, 2012 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Boston University (BU) graduate student Stefan Yohe, under the mentorship of Mark Grinstaff , PhD, BU professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry,  and Yolonda Colson, MD, PhD,...

2011-10-12 10:11:21

New equation developed by UCSB chemical engineers solves the mystery of forces between water-repelling and water-attracting molecules that are critical to industrial and medical applications The physical model to describe the hydrophobic interactions of molecules has been a mystery that has challenged scientists and engineers since the 19th century. Hydrophobic interactions are central to explaining why oil and water don't mix, how proteins are structured, and what holds biological...

2011-02-09 13:12:40

Discovery of mini 'water hammer' effect could lead to materials that water really hates Researchers from Northwestern University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have studied individual water droplets and discovered a miniature version of the "water hammer," an effect that produces the familiar radiator pipe clanging in older buildings. In piping systems, the water hammer occurs when fluid is forced to stop abruptly, causing huge pressure spikes that can rupture pipe walls....

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2011-01-26 10:45:54

By Emil Venere, Purdue University Researchers have invented a technique that uses inexpensive paper to make "microfluidic" devices for rapid medical diagnostics and chemical analysis. The innovation represents a way to enhance commercially available diagnostic devices that use paper-strip assays like those that test for diabetes and pregnancy. "With current systems that use paper test strips you can measure things like pH or blood sugar, but you can't perform more complex chemical assays,"...

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2010-08-24 11:08:31

ASU bioengineering research produces design for new device to help detect diseases quickly and at lower costs Arizona State University researchers have demonstrated a way to dramatically simplify testing patients for infectious diseases and unhealthy protein levels. New testing instrumentation developed by Antonia Garcia and John Schneider promises to make the procedure less costly and produce results in less time. Current testing is slow and expensive because of the complications of working...


Latest Hydrophobe Reference Libraries

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2005-09-09 07:46:52

The Water strider, (also known as: Skater, Pond Skater, Jesus Bug, Water Skeeter, water scooter, water skater, and Skimmer) is any of a number of predatory insects in the family Gerridae that rely on the surface tension of water to walk on top of it. They live on the surface of ponds, slow streams, marshes, and other quiet waters and can move very quickly (up to 1 m/s) over the surface of water. Aquarius remigis (formerly known as Gerris remigis) is one of the species in Gerridae known as...

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Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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