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Latest Hydrophobe Stories

2012-02-24 18:00:48

Researchers at the universities of Granada and Barcelona have described for the first time the diffusion of liquid water through nanochannels in molecular terms; nanochannels are extremely tiny channels with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers that scientists use to study the behavior of molecules (nm. a unit of length in the metric system equal to one billionth of a meter that is used in the field of nanotechnology). This study might have an important impact on water desalinization and...

2012-01-27 12:17:59

According to a recent study, there is a new mechanism of drug release using 3D superhydrophobic materials that utilizes air as a removable barrier to control the rate at which drug is released. The study was electronically published on January 16, 2012 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Boston University (BU) graduate student Stefan Yohe, under the mentorship of Mark Grinstaff , PhD, BU professor of biomedical engineering and chemistry,  and Yolonda Colson, MD, PhD,...

2011-10-12 10:11:21

New equation developed by UCSB chemical engineers solves the mystery of forces between water-repelling and water-attracting molecules that are critical to industrial and medical applications The physical model to describe the hydrophobic interactions of molecules has been a mystery that has challenged scientists and engineers since the 19th century. Hydrophobic interactions are central to explaining why oil and water don't mix, how proteins are structured, and what holds biological...

2011-02-09 13:12:40

Discovery of mini 'water hammer' effect could lead to materials that water really hates Researchers from Northwestern University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have studied individual water droplets and discovered a miniature version of the "water hammer," an effect that produces the familiar radiator pipe clanging in older buildings. In piping systems, the water hammer occurs when fluid is forced to stop abruptly, causing huge pressure spikes that can rupture pipe walls....

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2011-01-26 10:45:54

By Emil Venere, Purdue University Researchers have invented a technique that uses inexpensive paper to make "microfluidic" devices for rapid medical diagnostics and chemical analysis. The innovation represents a way to enhance commercially available diagnostic devices that use paper-strip assays like those that test for diabetes and pregnancy. "With current systems that use paper test strips you can measure things like pH or blood sugar, but you can't perform more complex chemical assays,"...

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2010-08-24 11:08:31

ASU bioengineering research produces design for new device to help detect diseases quickly and at lower costs Arizona State University researchers have demonstrated a way to dramatically simplify testing patients for infectious diseases and unhealthy protein levels. New testing instrumentation developed by Antonia Garcia and John Schneider promises to make the procedure less costly and produce results in less time. Current testing is slow and expensive because of the complications of working...

2010-05-04 15:00:50

Materials based on water ferns could reduce fuel consumption massively The hairs on the surface of water ferns could allow ships to have a 10 per cent decrease in fuel consumption. The plant has the rare ability to put on a gauzy skirt of air under water. Researchers at the University of Bonn, Rostock and Karlsruhe now show in the journal Advanced Materials (doi: 10.1002/adma.200904411) how the fern does this. Their results can possibly be used for the construction of new kinds of hulls with...

2010-02-26 07:36:37

Could lead to design of water-shedding materials for applications in energy, medicine, and more Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have obtained the first glimpse of miniscule air bubbles that keep water from wetting a super non-stick surface. Detailed information about the size and shape of these bubbles "” and the non-stick material the scientists created by "pock-marking" a smooth material with cavities measuring mere billionths of a meter...

2009-10-30 07:37:49

Inspired by water-resistant lotus leaves, the Pitt-developed solution repels freezing rain and provides the first evidence of anti-icing ability in superhydrophobic coatings, team reports in "Langmuir" Preventing the havoc wrought when freezing rain collects on roads, power lines, and aircrafts could be only a few nanometers away. A University of Pittsburgh-led team demonstrates in the Nov. 3 edition of "Langmuir" a nanoparticle-based coating developed in the lab of Di Gao, a chemical and...

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2009-10-26 09:07:42

What do spore-launching mushrooms have in common with highly water-repellant surfaces? According to Duke University engineers, the answer is "jumping" water droplets. As it turns out, the same phenomenon that occurs when it's time for certain mushrooms to eject spores also occurs when dew droplets skitter across a surface that is highly water repellant, or superhydrophobic. Using a specially designed high-speed camera and microscope set-up, the engineers for the first time captured the...


Latest Hydrophobe Reference Libraries

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2005-09-09 07:46:52

The Water strider, (also known as: Skater, Pond Skater, Jesus Bug, Water Skeeter, water scooter, water skater, and Skimmer) is any of a number of predatory insects in the family Gerridae that rely on the surface tension of water to walk on top of it. They live on the surface of ponds, slow streams, marshes, and other quiet waters and can move very quickly (up to 1 m/s) over the surface of water. Aquarius remigis (formerly known as Gerris remigis) is one of the species in Gerridae known as...

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