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Latest Hydrothermal vent Stories

2011-02-03 01:31:15

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment issue examines the basic elements of life In the search for life on Mars or any planet, there is much more than the presence of carbon and oxygen to consider. Using Earth's biogeochemical cycles as a reference point, elements like nitrogen, iron and sulfur are just as important for supporting life. As explored in studies published in February's open-access Special Issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, the most basic elements work together...

2010-12-08 02:24:13

Researchers have found compelling evidence for an extensive biological community living in porous rock deep beneath the seafloor. The microbes in this hidden world appear to be an important source of dissolved organic matter in deep ocean water, a finding that could dramatically change ideas about the ocean carbon cycle. Matthew McCarthy, associate professor of ocean sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, led a team of researchers from several institutions who analyzed the...

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2010-11-16 09:44:21

The Earth is constantly manufacturing new crust, spewing molten magma up along undersea ridges at the boundaries of tectonic plates. The process is critical to the planet's metabolism, including the cycle of underwater life and the delicate balance of carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. Now, scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have observed ocean crust forming in an entirely unexpected way"”one that may influence those cycles of life and carbon and, in turn,...

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2010-10-05 08:06:51

Montana State University researchers have discovered a rare oasis of life in the midst of hundreds of geothermal vents at the bottom of Yellowstone Lake. A colony of moss, worms and various forms of shrimp flourishes in an area where the water is inky black, about 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and a cauldron of nutrients, gases and poisons, the researchers reported in the September issue of Geobiology. The vent is close to 100 feet below the surface of Yellowstone Lake and a third of a mile offshore...

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2010-03-11 07:14:59

A deep-sea robot known as the "Autonomous Benthic Explorer" and made by Massachusetts researchers has been lost off the coast of Chile. Researchers immediately lost contact with the robot, nicknamed ABE, last Friday after it reached the Pacific Ocean floor, about 2 miles below the surface.  Scientist are assuming that a glass sphere that helped keep the $1.1 million robot buoyant may have imploded from the water pressure, destroying onboard communications.  This was the robot's...

2010-02-02 10:15:23

Earth's chemical energy powered early life through 'the most revolutionary idea in biology since Darwin' For 80 years it has been accepted that early life began in a 'primordial soup' of organic molecules before evolving out of the oceans millions of years later. Today the 'soup' theory has been overturned in a pioneering paper in BioEssays which claims it was the Earth's chemical energy, from hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, which kick-started early life. "Textbooks have it that life...

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2010-01-20 10:56:37

Deep within the Kairei Indian hydrothermal vent field, two-and-one-half miles below the central Indian Ocean, scientists have discovered a gastropod mollusk, whose armor could improve load-bearing and protective materials in everything from aircraft hulls to sports equipment. Researchers at the National Science Foundation-supported Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are studying the mollusk's physical and mechanical properties. A...

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2009-11-11 13:45:00

The scalding-hot sea that supposedly covered the early Earth may in fact never have existed, according to a new study by Stanford University researchers who analyzed isotope ratios in 3.4 billion-year-old ocean floor rocks. Their findings suggest that the early ocean was much more temperate and that, as a result, life likely diversified and spread across the globe much sooner in Earth's history than has been generally theorized. It also means that the chemical composition of the ancient ocean...

2009-09-18 07:24:37

Results point to potential use of microbes in offshore oil and gas exploration A team of scientists led by U of C grad Casey Hubert has detected high numbers of heat loving, or thermophilic, bacteria in subzero sediments in the Arctic Ocean off the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen. The bacterial spores might provide a unique opportunity to trace seepages of fluids from hot sub-seafloor habitats, possibly pointing towards undiscovered offshore petroleum reservoirs. These thermophiles exist in...

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2009-08-07 11:00:00

New unmanned probes have been developed and are ready for a full-scale survey of the seafloor of Japanese coastal waters on a hunt for mineral deposits.An official of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) said Thursday that the project will involve sending two underwater robots strapped to a ship in hope of discovering rare minerals in the seabed.The project is set to begin in fiscal year 2010.The chief mission of the researchers will be to find and study...


Latest Hydrothermal vent Reference Libraries

Pompeii Worm, Alvinella pompejana
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) is a species of polychaete worm, or bristle worm that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. It resides at hydrothermal vents, making it an extremophile, and was first discovered French marine biologists of the coat of the Galapagos Islands in the 1980s. It was described by Lucien Laubier and Daniel Desbruyeres as a deep-sea polychaete that could withstand extreme amounts of heat. The Pompeii worm can reach an average length of up to five inches and is...

Bathymodiolus Thermophilus
2013-04-16 18:50:25

Bathymodiolus thermophilus is a species of large, deepwater mussel, a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Mytilidae. The species was discovered at abyssal depths when submersible vehicles began exploring the deep ocean. It occurs on the sea bed, frequently in large numbers, close to hydrothermal vents where hot, sulphur-rich water wells up through the floor of the Pacific Ocean. This is a very large mussel with a dark brown periostracum, growing to a length of about 8 inches....

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'