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Latest Hydrothermal vent Stories

d3185d56e46d277bd6297d9c2a6ef3791
2009-02-10 09:10:53

The cycling of iron throughout the oceans has been an area of intense research for the last two decades. Oceanographers have spent a lot of time studying what has been affectionately labeled the Geritol effect ever since discovering that the lack of iron is a reason why phytoplankton grow lackadaisically in some of the most nutrient-rich surface waters. Just like humans, sometimes the ocean needs a dose of iron to function more effectively. It is well known that the hydrothermal vents lining...

62ef5785193f766fcdfdef4228f7a5711
2009-02-08 15:14:45

A team of scientists led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that iron dust, the rare but necessary nutrient for most life, can not only be washed into the ocean from rivers or blown out to sea, but it can bubble up from the depths of the ocean floor. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, connects life at the surface to events occurring at extreme depths and pressures"”two worlds long assumed to have little interaction. Brandy Toner, an assistant professor in...

244f3bfdf3dcd6d1210254ab83ff81121
2009-02-07 11:49:58

Discovery provides clues to how life thrives in extreme environments The genome of a marine bacterium living 2,500 meters below the ocean's surface is providing clues to how life adapts in extreme environments, according to a paper published Feb. 6, 2009, in the journal PLoS Genetics. The research focused on the bacterium Nautilia profundicola, a microbe that survives near deep-sea hydrothermal vents. It was found in a fleece-like lining on the backs of Pompeii worms, a type of tubeworm that...

2009-01-15 14:35:55

Huge methane gas bursts on Mars appear to be caused by bacteria rather than volcanic activity, U.S. government scientists said Thursday. The researchers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., did not say what bacteria created the methane, the principal component of natural gas. But their findings, published in the journal Science, suggest the possibility of present-day microbes living on the fourth planet from the sun, The New York Times reported. On Earth, bacteria known as...

4e44b99f1adfab3c7127c4ad493fa4ed1
2008-07-31 13:30:00

Scientists say they have captured a live deep-sea fish and three shrimp species at a record depth of 2,300m on the hot vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. A new trapping device has been developed that allows recovery of live animals under their natural pressure at greater depths than previously achieved. The researchers hope to be able to transfer the animals into an experimental lab to study their normal biology. "Pressurized recovery has been around for the past 30 years, but this is the...

b62640be130f9bc917d4f057d85f3f5a1
2008-06-25 14:35:00

Evidence of violent eruptions on Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic defies assumptions about seafloor pressure and volcanism A research team led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has uncovered evidence of explosive volcanic eruptions deep beneath the ice-covered surface of the Arctic Ocean. Such violent eruptions of splintered, fragmented rock"”known as pyroclastic deposits"”were not thought possible at great ocean depths because of the intense weight and pressure of...

988de25efba8c2944d58b7aa6a6125061
2008-05-28 19:40:00

Seafloor bacteria on ocean-bottom rocks are more abundant and diverse than previously thought, appearing to "feed" on the planet's oceanic crust, according to results of a study reported in this week's issue of the journal Nature. The findings pose intriguing questions about ocean chemistry and the co-evolution of Earth and life. Once considered a barren plain dotted with hydrothermal vents, the seafloor's rocky regions appear to be teeming with microbial life, say scientists from the Woods...

3f1c3fe8a51e773bbb4a367931d219591
2006-11-13 10:30:00

Two recent discoveries in astrobiology challenge many of our assumptions about an integrated biological community on Earth. At the microbial level, it seems that there may be previously hidden biospheres that exist on Earth alongside our more familiar neighbors. One such community has been found deeply buried underground, while the other lives in the sea alongside more familiar life forms. Potentially among the most important recent discoveries in astrobiology is the finding of deeply buried...

d127418ea70b8383ed923d7feb397bdf1
2005-11-17 07:35:02

Arizona State University geochemist Lynda Williams and her colleagues have discovered that certain clay minerals under conditions at the bottom of the ocean may have acted as incubators for the first organic molecules on Earth. Astrobiology Magazine -- Arizona State University geochemist Lynda Williams and her colleagues have discovered that certain clay minerals under conditions at the bottom of the ocean may have acted as incubators for the first organic molecules on Earth. Williams'...

d7ae09729cae54aebd1456016a37d1f21
2005-10-05 06:55:00

NASA -- Dr. Pan Conrad is on a quest. Her search for signs of life in extreme environments has taken the JPL astrobiologist from the icy realms of the Arctic and the dry valleys of Antarctica to the scorching sands of Death Valley, California. The hunt landed Conrad at the bottom of the ocean with Oscar-winning director James Cameron and a role in his film "Aliens of the Deep." Last year, Cameron invited Conrad and her JPL colleague Dr. Lonne Lane to join him on an expedition to one of the...


Latest Hydrothermal vent Reference Libraries

Pompeii Worm, Alvinella pompejana
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) is a species of polychaete worm, or bristle worm that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. It resides at hydrothermal vents, making it an extremophile, and was first discovered French marine biologists of the coat of the Galapagos Islands in the 1980s. It was described by Lucien Laubier and Daniel Desbruyeres as a deep-sea polychaete that could withstand extreme amounts of heat. The Pompeii worm can reach an average length of up to five inches and is...

Bathymodiolus Thermophilus
2013-04-16 18:50:25

Bathymodiolus thermophilus is a species of large, deepwater mussel, a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Mytilidae. The species was discovered at abyssal depths when submersible vehicles began exploring the deep ocean. It occurs on the sea bed, frequently in large numbers, close to hydrothermal vents where hot, sulphur-rich water wells up through the floor of the Pacific Ocean. This is a very large mussel with a dark brown periostracum, growing to a length of about 8 inches....

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