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Preference For Built-Up Habitats Could Explain Rapid Spread

Preference For Built-Up Habitats Could Explain Rapid Spread Of The Tree Bumblebee In UK

Lisa Horton, University of East Anglia The strikingly rapid spread of the Tree Bumblebee in Britain could be occurring because the bees readily live alongside humans in towns and villages – according to research from the University of East...

Latest Hymenoptera Stories

Are Fire Ants Using Natural Corridors To Advance The Front?
2014-08-04 03:10:54

By Cheryl Dybas, National Science Foundation Heading for a summer picnic or hike, or just out to mow your lawn? In the US Southeast and beyond, you might want to watch where you walk. Fire ants. Crossing the border from South America, they're on the march northward. How does habitat--in particular, corridors that connect one place with another--help the ants spread? To find out, the National Science Foundation (NSF) talked with ecologist and program director Doug Levey of its...

Bumblebees Able To Spot Which Flowers Offer Best Rewards
2014-08-01 03:55:22

University of Exeter Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features, like petal color, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter. Unlike nectar, bees do not ingest pollen whilst foraging on flowers, and so until now it has been unclear whether they are able to form associative relationships between what a flower looks like and the quality of its pollen. The study...

Radio Frequency ID Tags Attached To Honey Bees Reveal Hive Dynamics
2014-07-25 03:12:10

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place. The findings are reported in the journal Animal Behaviour. [ Watch The Video: Hive Intelligence: How Honey Bees Adjust To Catastrophic Loss ] Tagging the...

Bees Tongue Size Matters For A Good Relationship With Flowers
2014-07-17 03:12:23

Ecological Society of America For bees and the flowers they pollinate, a compatible tongue length is essential to a successful relationship. Some bees and plants are very closely matched, with bee tongue sized to the flower depth. Other bee species are generalists, flitting among flower species to drink nectar and collect pollen from a diverse variety of plants. Data on tongue lengths can help ecologists understand and predict the behavior, resilience and invasiveness of bee populations....

Bees 'Shouts' Warn Intruders That A Food Source Will Be Defended
2014-07-08 08:15:09

[ Watch the Video: Stingless Bees Fight Over Food Source ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you were foraging for food in a highly competitive environment and you found a very lucrative source, how would you communicate this prize to your teammates without giving it away to your competitors? This is the situation bees find themselves in quite often. Scientists believe that many animals, faced with eavesdroppers, have developed "whispers" to prevent revealing...

Tracking Ant Diversity In The US With Citizen Science And Cookies
2014-07-08 07:24:20

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers have combined cookies, citizen science and vigorous methods to track the diversity of different ant species in the United States. Along with international partners, global research is now being done to monitor how ants are moving and surviving in today’s world. The paper, “Ecologists, educators, and writers collaborate with the public to assess backyard diversity in The School of Ants Project,” was published online...

Study Of Sociable Weavers Shows Everybody Needs Good Neighbors
2014-07-07 03:56:07

The University of Sheffield A new insight into one of the biggest questions in science – why some animals, including humans, work together to maintain a common good – has been achieved by scientists at the University of Sheffield. Sociable weavers, a highly social and co-operative breeding bird from the savannahs of southern Africa, build the largest nests of any bird, housing colonies of up to several hundred birds that can often weigh tonnes and last for decades. The massive...

2014-07-03 10:08:00

PLOS New species of spider wasp may use chemical signals from dead ants to protect nest A new species of spider wasp, the 'Bone-house Wasp,' may use chemical cues from dead ants as a nest protection strategy, according to a recent study published July 2, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michael Staab from University of Freiburg, Germany, and his colleagues from China and Germany. Wasps use a wide variety of nest protection strategies, including digging holes or occupying...

A Lesson From “Ant-stronauts” On The International Space Station
2014-06-24 03:24:15

Jessica Nimon, NASA A recent study on the International Space Station brings to mind Aesop’s fable of the Ant and the Grasshopper, and it is pretty amazing what we can learn from these industrious insects. The activities of a crew of ants that lived aboard the orbiting laboratory as part of the Ants in Space CSI-06 investigation are inspiring students and scientists alike. But the investigation has the potential to do far more than motivate; the data collected can teach us about...

ants beat google
2014-05-28 05:02:29

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Classic literature has touted the work ethic of ants and scientists have determined that they have the largest brains of any insect. Now, researchers have also discovered that the creatures' group processing skills when it comes to foraging for food would put the most complex online search engines to shame. Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of German and Chinese scientists explain that the...


Latest Hymenoptera Reference Libraries

Jack Jumper Ant, Myrmecia pilosula
2013-07-10 13:00:54

The jack jumper ant (Myrmecia pilosula), known by other names including the jumping jack or hopper ant, is a species of bull ant that can be found in Australia. Its range includes Tasmania, New South Wales, and rural areas of Victoria. This species is unique in that its genome only holds on set of chromosomes, which is the lowest number of chromosomes that any animal can hold. Like other bull ants, this species can build nests under rocks or under dirt mounds. The jack jumper reaches an...

Inchman, Myrmecia forficate
2013-07-10 12:28:46

The inchman (Myrmecia forficate) is a species of bull ant that can be found in Australia, in a range that includes Tasmania and possibly southeastern areas of Australia. This species is gregarious, living in colonies like most other ant species, but it forages for food alone. Nests often go unseen and are typically found under rocks.  It reaches an average body length of up to one inch long, the trait from which it received its common name. The inchman is both a scavenger and a...

0_1b176b063c37655d81f4ab248352d3de
2005-09-12 11:56:41

A wasp is any insect of the order Hymenoptera and suborder Apocrita that is not a bee, sawfly, or an ant. The less familiar suborder Symphyta includes the sawflies and wood wasps, which differ from the Apocrita by having a broad connection between the thorax and abdomen. Also, Symphyta larvae are mostly herbivorous and "caterpillarlike", whereas those of Apocrita are largely predatory or parasitic. Most familiar wasps belong to the Aculeata, a division of the Apocrita whose ovipositors are...

40_7105f67ef0ac80eaa97446c6b40c0af0
2005-09-09 09:51:50

The Bombyliids are a large family of flies with hundreds of genera. Their life cycles are not well known. Adults generally feed on nectar and pollen, thus are pollinators of flowers. They superficially resemble bees, thus are commonly called bee flies, and this may offer the adults some protection from predators. The larval stage are predators or parasitoids of other insect eggs and larvae. The adult females usually deposit eggs in the vicinity of possible hosts, quite often in the burrows...

0_883369ca3027116bc769a5aa2feb2314
2005-09-09 09:43:40

The bumblebee is a flying insect of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae and a relative of the common honeybee. The bumblebee feeds on nectar and gathers pollen to feed its young. They are beneficial to humans and the plant world alike, and tend to be larger than other members of the bee family. Most bumblebee species are gentle. From this comes their original name: "Humblebee". Bumblebees are social insects that are known for their black and yellow striped bodies, a commonality among the...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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