Quantcast

Latest Hyoid bone Stories

Neanderthal Man May Have Been Able To Speak, According To New Evidence
2013-12-21 05:15:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New analysis of a Neanderthal’s hyoid bone provides evidence suggesting the extinct humanoids had the ability to speak, an international team of researchers write in the latest edition of the journal PLoS ONE. Previously, a 1989 description of this horseshoe shaped structure in the neck originating from a fossil found in Kebara Cave in Israel “fueled scientific debate on the evolution of speech and complex language,” the...

2011-01-10 15:07:49

Common genetic recipes pattern organs as different as shark gills and human hands A SCUBA expedition in Australia and New Zealand to find the rare embryos of an unusual shark cousin enabled American and British researchers to confirm new developmental similarities between fish and mammals. Elephant fish, a relative of sharks, utilize the same genetic process for forming skeletal gill covers that lizards and mammals use to form fingers and toes, researchers at the University of Chicago and the...

2008-02-04 16:30:01

Each Monday, this column turns a page in history to explore the discoveries, events and people that continue to affect the history being made today. Our gift of the gab is all due to a small horseshoe-shaped bone suspended in the muscles of our neck, like a piece of fruit trapped in Jell-O. The hyoid bone, which is the only bone in the body not connected to any other, is the foundation of speech and is found only in humans and Neanderthals. Other animals have versions of the...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related