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Latest Hypothalamus Stories

2012-05-22 09:17:51

Neurogenesis spurred by a high-fat diet encourages more eating and fat storage, animal study suggests New nerve cells formed in a select part of the brain could hold considerable sway over how much you eat and consequently weigh, new animal research by Johns Hopkins scientists suggests in a study published in the May issue of Nature Neuroscience. The idea that the brain is still forming new nerve cells, or neurons, into adulthood has become well-established over the past several...

2012-05-03 09:06:03

It seems improbable that a baby born underweight would be prone to obesity, but it is well documented that these children tend to put on weight in youth if they're allowed free access to calories. Now, researchers believe they understand why this happens. A new animal model study at UCLA has found that in low—birth-weight babies whose growth was restricted in the womb, the level of appetite-producing neuropeptides in the brain's hypothalamus – the central control of the...

2012-03-23 05:43:10

(Ivanhoe Newswire)-- A ravenous appetite may be what causes many overweight people to be obese. Researchers have found a mutation in a single gene is responsible for the inability of neurons to effectively send out appetite suppressing signals from the body to the correct area of the brain. A study suggests that there might be a way to stimulate expression of that gene to treat obesity caused by uncontrolled eating. Researchers found that a mutation in the brain-derived neurotrophic...

2012-03-19 23:01:28

Recent medical studies conducted at the St. Louis Veterans Affairs Hospital and research posted at health and wellness portal BeWellBuzz.com have found new ways of controlling the ℠hunger gene´ which have shown significant ways of controlling weight gain. Las Vegas, NV (PRWEB) March 19, 2012 Since its discovery in 1999 by medical researcher Masayasu Kojima, a major indicator of weight gain and obesity has been an active amino acid peptide produced in our bodies known as Ghrelin....

2012-03-19 04:53:45

The discovery offers clues about how to turn on brain sensitivity to leptin and insulin, hormones that turn off appetite Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have revealed how a mutation in a single gene is responsible for the inability of neurons to effectively pass along appetite suppressing signals from the body to the right place in the brain. What results is obesity caused by a voracious appetite. Their study, published March 18th on Nature Medicine's website,...

2012-03-15 12:35:30

Therapeutic targets also discovered for potential treatments for eating disorders The meal is pushed way, untouched. Loss of appetite can be a fleeting queasiness or continue to the point of emaciation. While it's felt in the gut, more is going on inside the head. New findings are emerging about brain and body messaging pathways that lead to loss of appetite, and the systems in place to avoid starvation. Today, scientists report in Nature about a brain circuit that mediates the loss of...

2012-02-29 11:44:34

Yale University researchers have discovered a key cellular mechanism that may help the brain control how much we eat, what we weigh, and how much energy we have. The findings, published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, describe the regulation of a family of cells that project throughout the nervous system and originate in an area of the brain call the hypothalamus, which has been long known to control energy balances. Scientists and pharmaceutical companies are...

2012-02-23 13:13:31

After we sense a threat, our brain center responsible for responding goes into gear, setting off a chain of biochemical reactions leading to the release of cortisol from the adrenal glands. Dr. Gil Levkowitz and his team in the Molecular Cell Biology Department have now revealed a new kind of ON-OFF switch in the brain for regulating the production of a main biochemical signal from the brain that stimulates cortisol release in the body. This finding, which was recently published in Neuron,...

2012-02-03 09:00:00

Men and women may be equals, but they often behave differently when it comes to sex and parenting. Now a study of the differences between the brains of male and female mice in the February 3rd issue of the Cell Press journal Cell provides insight into how our own brains might be programmed for these stereotypically different behaviors. The new evidence shows that the sex hormones — testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone — act in a key region of the brain, switching certain...

Male and Female Behavior Deconstructed
2012-02-03 04:50:16

[ Watch the Video ] UCSF Team Uncovers Genes Influenced by Sex Hormones that Control Masculine and Feminine Behaviors in Mice Hormones shape our bodies, make us fertile, excite our most basic urges, and as scientists have known for years, they govern the behaviors that separate men from women. But how? Now a team of scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has uncovered many genes influenced by the male and female sex hormones testosterone and estrogen that,...


Latest Hypothalamus Reference Libraries

Hypothalamus
2013-03-04 13:43:30

The hypothalamus is an organ that serves as an important link, along the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis, between the nervous system and the endocrine system. It is located within the cranial cavity, in the cerebrum, right below the thalamus. It also forms the floor of the third ventricle in the brain. It contains neural pathways, blood vessels, glial cells, and secretory cells—all of which work together to control things like body temperature, hunger, thirst, sleep, and hormonal and...

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Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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