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Latest Hypothalamus Stories

2011-05-04 14:40:52

Weizmann Institute scientists have added another piece to the obesity puzzle, showing how and why a certain protein that is active in a small part of the brain contributes to weight gain. This research appeared today in Cell Metabolism. Prof. Ari Elson and his team in the Institute's Molecular Genetics Department made the discovery when working with female mice that were genetically engineered to lack this protein, called protein tyrosine phosphatase epsilon (PTPe, for short). The...

2011-04-20 13:16:45

The brain's hypothalamus plays a key role in obesity and one of its major complications "“ type 2 diabetes. Nerve cells in the hypothalamus detect nutrients and hormones circulating in the blood and then coordinate a complex series of behavioral and physiological responses to maintain a balance between calories eaten and calories burned. Obesity and diabetes can result when this regulatory mechanism goes awry. Now, research by postdoctoral fellow Cl©mence Blouet, Ph.D., and Gary...

2011-04-07 08:05:53

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- It was recently reported that women with low body fat, including runners and dancers as well as women with eating disorders, may be able to restore their fertility and reduce their risk of bone fractures by taking doses of the hormone leptin. Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) offered the first definitive proof that a lack of leptin contributes to hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) -- a condition in which menstrual periods of women cease, triggering...

2011-04-06 11:52:12

All those salty snacks available at the local tavern might be doing more than increasing your thirst: They could also play a role in suppressing social anxiety. New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) shows that elevated levels of sodium blunt the body's natural responses to stress by inhibiting stress hormones that would otherwise be activated in stressful situations. These hormones are located along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which controls reactions to...

2011-04-05 00:07:50

Treatment could help athletes, women with eating disorders Women with extremely low body fat, including runners and dancers, as well as women with eating disorders, are prone to develop hypothalamic amenorrhea, a condition in which their menstrual periods cease, triggering such serious problems as infertility and osteoporosis. Now, a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) offers the first definitive proof that a lack of leptin contributes to hypothalamic...

2011-03-02 02:05:26

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a signaling pathway in the brain that's sufficient to induce cellular leptin resistance, a problem that decreases the body's ability to "hear" that it is full and should stop eating. "Leptin resistance is a significant factor, yet the mechanisms that underlie the problem remain unclear," said Dr. Joel Elmquist, professor of internal medicine and pharmacology at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study appearing in the March...

2011-01-20 22:05:04

Preventing the vasopressin neurons from swelling, and maintaining their size The anti-diuretic hormone "vasopressin" is released from the brain, and known to work in the kidney, suppressing the diuresis. Here, the Japanese research team led by Professor Yasunobu OKADA, Director-General of National Institute for Physiological Sciences (NIPS), and Ms. Kaori SATO, a graduate student of The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, clarified the novel function of "vasopressin" that works in the...

2011-01-12 14:46:11

A Mayo Clinic researcher says the surprising findings suggest the possibility of a novel treatment for obesity A study by researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida and Washington University School of Medicine adds a new twist to the body of evidence suggesting human obesity is due in part to genetic factors. While studying hormone receptors in laboratory mice, neuroscientists identified a new molecular player responsible for the regulation of appetite and metabolism. In the Jan. 11...

2011-01-04 15:22:17

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have created a new and exciting mouse model to study how lipid sensing and metabolism in the brain relate to the regulation of energy balance and body weight. The research team, led by Hong Wang, PhD, created mice with a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in neurons, and observed two important reactions. First, the mouse models ate less and second, they became sedentary. Because LPL is important to the delivery of fatty acids to...

2010-12-23 02:13:04

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have pinpointed a tiny site in the brain where the hormone leptin may help trigger the onset of puberty. The findings in mice indicate that a site within the hypothalamus called the ventral premammillary nucleus, or PMV, is the target where the hormone leptin effectively kick starts puberty in females. Researchers have known that puberty starts when individuals have enough energy stores or fat to meet the demands of reproduction, and that leptin...


Latest Hypothalamus Reference Libraries

Hypothalamus
2013-03-04 13:43:30

The hypothalamus is an organ that serves as an important link, along the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis, between the nervous system and the endocrine system. It is located within the cranial cavity, in the cerebrum, right below the thalamus. It also forms the floor of the third ventricle in the brain. It contains neural pathways, blood vessels, glial cells, and secretory cells—all of which work together to control things like body temperature, hunger, thirst, sleep, and hormonal and...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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