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Latest Hypoxia Stories

2014-07-03 10:57:32

Society for Experimental Biology Austrian researchers have found that jetlag has severe effects on red blood cells, possibly explaining the high incidence of heart disease seen in shift workers. However, these effects can be counterbalanced by fresh, young red blood cells – making blood donations a potential therapy for shift workers. The scientists, led by Dr Margit Egg (University of Innsbruck), worked on zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model organism which, like humans, is active...

tibetans and denisovans
2014-07-03 05:17:45

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A gene acquired from an extinct cousin of modern humans is responsible for helping Tibetans adapt to high altitudes, according to new research published online by the weekly science journal Nature on Wednesday. Scientists from the University of California, Berkeley and Chinese genomics organization BGI-Shenzen found that Tibetans acquired the ability when their ancestors mated with Denisovans or individuals related to the...

coastal dead zone
2014-05-19 12:44:34

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Containing dissolved oxygen concentrations of less than 2 or 3 parts per million, hypoxic waters in estuaries and sections of coastline are essentially “dead zones” where life cannot exist. According to a new study in the journal Nature Geoscience, iron discharged from continental sediments acts as a limiting switch that could prevent coastal waters from creating a runaway feedback loop that leads to less and less dissolved oxygen...

Climbing Mount Everest To Learn More About Type 2 Diabetes
2014-04-16 07:06:22

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most people engage in extreme sports, such as climbing Mount Everest, in an attempt to gain insight about themselves. A group of researchers from the University of Southampton and University College London (UCL) climbed Mount Everest to gain new insights into the molecular process of how some people get Type II diabetes. Their findings, published in PLOS ONE, could lead to new ways of preventing people from getting the condition. The...

Bar-headed Geese Give Insight Into Low Oxygen Tolerance
2014-04-08 14:58:41

University of Exeter A new study into how the world's highest flying bird, the bar-headed goose, is able to survive at extreme altitudes may have future implications for low oxygen medical conditions in humans. An international team of scientists recently tracked the bar-headed goose while it migrated across the Himalayas. Now they have shown how these birds are able to tolerate running at top speed while breathing only 7% oxygen. Exercising at high altitude is a massive challenge...

Oxygen Depletion In Baltic Sea Is 10 Times Worse Than A Hundred Years Ago
2014-04-01 14:34:17

Aarhus University This news release is available in German. After several years of discussions, researchers from Aarhus University (Denmark), Lund University (Sweden) and Stockholm University (Sweden) have determined that nutrients from the land are the main cause of widespread areas of oxygen depletion. The results were published on 31 March in the prestigious American journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Nutrients are the villain The deepest areas of the...

2014-02-27 18:37:30

Reducing the size of the Lake Erie "dead zone" to acceptable levels will require cutting nutrient pollution nearly in half in coming decades, at a time when climate change is expected to make such reductions more difficult. That's one of the main conclusions of a comprehensive new study that documents recent trends in Lake Erie's health. It offers science-based guidance to policymakers seeking to reduce the size of toxic algae blooms and oxygen-starved regions called hypoxic zones, or dead...

Million Dollar Grand Challenge Issued For Dead Zone Solutions
2014-02-19 04:11:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In response to President Obama’s call for institutions and philanthropists to help find solutions to the world’s most pressing issues, Tulane University announced Monday that it would offer a $1 million prize to the researcher or entrepreneur who devises the best plan to combat annual “dead zones” in lakes and oceans. In a statement, the university said that it was soliciting innovative solutions to battle hypoxia, or...

2013-11-29 12:54:05

Scientists may have found a new treatment that can help people with spinal cord injuries walk better. The research is published in the November 27, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "About 59 percent of all spinal injuries are incomplete, leaving pathways that could allow the spinal cord to change in a way that allows people to walk again. Unfortunately, usually a person affected by this type of spinal injury seldom recovers the...

The Genetics Of Mountain Sickness
2013-08-16 05:14:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers has discovered the genetic basis of chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a condition developed during prolonged exposure to high altitudes, according to research appearing in the August 15 edition of the American Journal of Human Genetics. The condition, which is also known as “Monge's disease,” is the result of low oxygen levels and can cause severe damage to the body, including heart attacks,...


Word of the Day
lambent
  • Licking.
  • Hence Running along or over a surface, as if in the act of licking; flowing over or along; lapping or bathing; softly bright; gleaming.
This word comes the Latin 'lambere,' to lick.
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