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Latest Hypoxia Stories

2010-07-20 14:32:12

Air travel poses no "significant threat" to cardiovascular health, with few conditions likely to warrant restrictions, concludes new guidance published in the journal Heart. The guidance, which has been drawn up by the British Cardiovascular Society, was prompted by widespread public concern about the impact of air travel on health and a House of Lords Science and Technology Committee report on this same issue, published in 2007. The House of Lords report called for definitive specialist...

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2010-07-02 09:30:45

Mice at altitude save oxygen during exercise by using more carbohydrates rather than fat, Canadian and Peruvian scientists reveal This fuel-preference represents an adaptation in high altitude mice to use oxygen more efficiently than their low-altitude counterparts. "Andean mouse species have independently evolved a strategy to maximize energy yield when little oxygen is available" explain lead researchers Marie-Pierre Schippers and Grant McClelland from McMaster University. It is very...

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2010-06-30 06:40:42

The northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone, an underwater area with little or no oxygen known commonly as the "dead zone," could be larger than the recent average, according to a forecast by a team of NOAA-supported scientists from the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, Louisiana State University, and the University of Michigan. Scientists are predicting the area could measure between 6,500 and 7,800 square miles, or an area roughly the size of the state of New Jersey. The average of the...

2010-06-28 11:11:16

University of Michigan aquatic ecologist Donald Scavia and his colleagues say this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" is expected to be larger than average, continuing a decades-long trend that threatens the health of a $659 million fishery. The 2010 forecast, released today by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), calls for a Gulf dead zone of between 6,500 and 7,800 square miles, an area roughly the size of Lake Ontario. The most likely scenario, according to...

2010-06-15 01:04:40

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health have established the first link between air pollution and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), a known cause of cardiovascular diseases. Antonella Zanobetti, Ph.D., Susan Redline, MD, MPH, Diane Gold, M.D., M.P.H. and colleagues explored the link between air pollution levels, temperature increases and sleep-disordered breathing using data from the Sleep Heart Health Study, which included more than 6,000...

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2010-06-07 09:05:00

While an out-of-control gusher deep in the Gulf of Mexico fouls beaches and chokes marshland habitat, another threat could be growing below the oil-slicked surface. The nation's worst oil spill could worsen and expand the oxygen-starved region of the Gulf labeled "the dead zone" for its inhospitability to marine life, suggests Michigan State University professor Nathaniel Ostrom. It could already be feeding microbes that thrive around natural undersea oil seeps, he says, tiny critters that...

2010-06-02 12:59:23

Patients who have excessive oxygen levels in arterial blood (hyperoxia) following resuscitation from cardiac arrest have a higher rate of death in the hospital than similar patients without arterial hyperoxia, according to a study in the June 2 issue of JAMA. The most common lethal conse­quence of cardiovascular dis­ease is sudden cardiac arrest. Even if return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from cardiac arrest is achieved, approximately 60 percent of...

2010-05-17 08:31:49

Sleep apnea may cause metabolic changes that increase insulin resistance, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The intermittent hypoxia associated with sleep apnea causes a distinct drop in insulin sensitivity in mice, even though chronic hypoxia, such as that associated with high altitude, did not. The research was reported at the ATS 2010 International Conference in New Orleans. To determine whether intermittent hypoxia (IH) and chronic hypoxia (CH)...

2010-05-05 11:36:34

A special issue of Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases High altitude medicine is a "natural research laboratory" for the study of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. As such, it can shed light on conditions and diseases that mimic the low oxygen content of the atmosphere at the top of mountains. Yves Allemann, MD, FESC, Swiss Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital, Bern, and Urs Scherrer, MD, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, have assembled an international...

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2010-04-30 07:58:54

A unique three-year longitudinal and vertical study of Central New York's Three Rivers system"”involving the Oswego, Oneida and Seneca rivers"”has revealed that oxygen resources have become degraded by several stressors, including the impact of wastewater treatment plants, nonpoint runoff, an increase in invasive zebra mussels and channelization of the flow. As oxygen is necessary to support life in aquatic ecosystems, its measurement is essential for gauging the overall state of...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.