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Latest Ice age Stories

Black Carbon Suspect In Mid-1800s Alps Glacier Retreat
2013-09-03 08:17:32

University of Colorado at Boulder Scientists have uncovered strong evidence that soot, or black carbon, sent into the air by a rapidly industrializing Europe, likely caused the abrupt retreat of mountain glaciers in the European Alps. The research, published Sept. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help resolve a longstanding scientific debate about why the Alps glaciers retreated beginning in the 1860s, decades before global temperatures started rising again....

Looking Back To Look Forward
2013-05-20 04:57:58

[ Watch the Video: What is Global Warming ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are looking to events of the past to better understand how rainfall patterns across the Indo-Pacific warm pool — the massive pool of warm water stretching along the equator from Africa to the western Pacific Ocean — will change due to global warming. As part of their study, Pedro...

Record Warming Will Lead To Faster Melting Glaciers And The Loss Looks Irreversible
2013-03-08 08:56:04

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the next few centuries, Canada's Arctic Archipelago glaciers will melt faster than ever, according to a new study. Research has revealed that 20 percent of the Canadian Arctic glaciers may have disappeared by the end of our current century, leading to an additional sea level rise of 1.4 inches. The findings, funded in part by EU's ice2sea program, are available online and will be published in an upcoming issue of Geophysical...

Global Sea-Level Rise Could Occur Unevenly Across Globe
2013-02-19 15:43:16

Peter Suciu for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The fact sea levels could rise if the polar ice caps melt has been long established, but according to new research some regions could see greater increases than others. According to research published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, sophisticated computer modeling of sea-level rise over the coming century suggests parts of the Pacific could see the highest rates of rise while some polar regions will actually...

Dramatic Glacial Melting In Andes Blamed On Climate Change
2013-01-22 13:47:37

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Only four months ago and a continent away, researchers were looking into the varying degrees of ice accumulation and ablation within the Himalayan glacial system. In that report, published by the National Research Council (NRC), the team concluded that glacial melt could pose significant issues for the native populations that depend on the water runoff from these glaciers for their day-to-day lives. An international team of...

Greenhouse Gas Associated With High Sea Levels Over Past 40 Million Years
2013-01-03 09:12:39

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, have found that greenhouse gas concentrations similar to the present — almost 400 parts per million - were systematically associated with sea levels at least 30 feet above current levels by comparing reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and sea level over the past 40 million years. The study, published online in the Proceedings of the National...

Global Warming Could Prevent Next Ice Age
2012-11-09 10:30:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online We hear reports every day about the dangers and evils of carbon emissions, but could there be a good side? A research team at the University of Gothenburg thinks so. Their new study, published in Mires and Peat, suggests that mankind's emissions of fossil carbon, and the temperature rise that accompanies it, could prove to be our salvation from the next ice age. The current increase in peatland extent could reverse this effect,...

Understanding Antarctic Ice Loss
2012-10-22 19:44:40

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Amazing GRACE. Scientists and researchers have some interesting news out of Antarctica. The rate of global sea level change has been fairly well-established. The understanding for exactly why this is occurring got a new wrinkle this past week. Utilizing the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data, a team was able to more accurately calculate the ice sheet mass loss by mapping and removing the mass changes...

Polar Ice Sheet Melt Influenced By Underwater Landscape
2012-10-17 12:25:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As average global temperatures rise, climatologists are scrambling to see how this development might affect polar ice sheet melt, which could potentially result in a dangerous rise in sea levels. In studying the polar ice sheets around Antarctica, a group of British researchers has found that the shape of water channels beneath the ice can have a strong effect on ice behavior, temporarily hiding indications of its retreat. A report...

Clam Shells Record Climate Events Over Past Thousand Years
2012-10-02 15:05:18

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Modern climatologists have access to a wide array of technological tools, but an international team looking to study climate events from the past thousand years has decided to utilize something a little more old school. Researchers led by Alan Wanamaker from Iowa State University have been collecting clam shells from the waters of the North Atlantic because the mollusks act as tiny recorders, storing information about their environment...


Latest Ice age Reference Libraries

Arctic Ocean
2013-04-18 22:31:23

The Arctic Ocean which is located in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the shallowest and smallest of the world’s five major oceanic divisions. The International Hydrographic Organization recognizes it as an ocean, although, some oceanographers consider it as the Arctic Mediterranean Sea or simply, the Arctic Sea, classifying it a Mediterranean sea or an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. Alternatively, the Arctic Ocean can be considered as the northernmost...

22_319d33a1f9f347feb9c006816dbc1357
2009-07-06 17:58:20

The water cycle (or hydrologic cycle) describes the continuous movement of water above, below, and on the planet. Since the water cycle is in fact a "cycle", there is no beginning or end. Water exists in three states: liquid, vapor, and ice. Although the balance of water on our planet is fairly constant, individual water molecules may come and go. The water cycle is driven by the sun. The sun heats the oceans and allows water to evaporate into the air. The sun also heats snow and ice which...

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