Quantcast

Latest Ice core Stories

cc234f27df9bef3292b437a2535921b91
2009-08-26 16:15:00

A new international research effort on the Greenland ice sheet with the University of Colorado at Boulder as the lead U.S. institution set a record for single-season deep ice-core drilling this summer, recovering more than a mile of ice core that is expected to help scientists better assess the risks of abrupt climate change in the future.The project, known as the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling, or NEEM, is being undertaken by 14 nations and is led by the University of Copenhagen. The...

fe13425102528f6a2f27dcadbbae0d481
2009-08-24 11:25:00

The first season of the international drilling project NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) in north-western Greenland was completed at August 20th. A research team, with the participation of the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in the Helmholtz Association, has drilled an ice core of altogether 1757.87 m length on the Greenland inland ice within 110 days. It is expected to contain data on climate history of about 38.000 years. The oldest ice comes from a period...

5921d89b808c40a39c04d450a5c5d8bf
2009-07-01 10:40:00

New research, which reconstructs the extent of ice in the sea between Greenland and Svalbard from the 13th century to the present indicates that there has never been so little sea ice as there is now. The research results from the Niels Bohr Institute, among others, are published in the scientific journal, Climate Dynamics.There are of course neither satellite images nor instrumental records of the climate all the way back to the 13th century, but nature has its own 'archive' of the climate...

4b60d54a5bce40428923239639648a801
2009-06-18 11:32:14

Two abrupt and drastic climate events, 700 years apart and more than 45 centuries ago, are teasing  scientists who are now trying to use ancient records to predict future world climate. The events "“ one, a massive, long-lived drought believed to have dried large portions of Africa and Asia, and the other, a rapid cooling that accelerated the growth of tropical glaciers "“ left signals in ice cores and other geologic records from around the world. Lonnie Thompson, University...

2009-06-17 14:54:06

U.S. scientists have used deep ocean sediment to reconstruct an ancient climate record dating to more than 500,000 years. Ohio State University researchers said the sediment -- trapped within the top 65.6 feet of a 1,312-foot sediment core drilled in 2005 in the North Atlantic Ocean -- has provided new information about the four glacial cycles that occurred during that period. We've now generated a climate record from this core that has a very high temporal resolution, one that is...

2009-06-15 16:25:20

Researchers here have used sediment from the deep ocean bottom to reconstruct a record of ancient climate that dates back more than the last half-million years.The record, trapped within the top 20 meters (65.6 feet) of a 400-meter (1,312-foot) sediment core drilled in 2005 in the North Atlantic Ocean by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, gives new information about the four glacial cycles that occurred during that period.The new research was presented today at the Chapman Conference on...

221bdd7c355964de8287389d5cf5c89f1
2009-06-11 14:55:30

When the climate warmed relatively quickly about 14,700 years ago, seasonal monsoons moved southward, dropping more rain on the Earth's oceans at the expense of tropical areas, according to climate researchers. If the same pattern occurs in the coming decades as the Earth's temperatures rises due to climate change, the highly-populated regions of the world that depend on monsoons could face more wildfires, water shortages and lower agricultural production.In an article to be published in the...

2009-06-11 13:55:00

 At times in the distant past, an abrupt change in climate has been associated with a shift of seasonal monsoons to the south, a new study concludes, causing more rain to fall over the oceans than in the Earth's tropical regions, and leading to a dramatic drop in global vegetation growth.If similar changes were to happen to the Earth's climate today as a result of global warming "“ as scientists believe is possible - this might lead to drier tropics, more wildfires and declines in...

21d7b19d9dac3c1d45e78c6dfedeea731
2009-03-30 07:40:00

Dust trapped deep in Antarctic ice sheets is helping scientists unravel details of past climate change. Researchers have found that dust blown south to Antarctica from the windy plains of Patagonia "“ and deposited in the ice periodically over 80,000 years "“ provides vital information about glacier activity. Scientists hope the findings will help them to better understand how the global climate has changed during the past ice age, and so help predict environmental changes in the...

72b529c43699cc9266504df92a5e18671
2009-01-22 14:20:00

The Antarctic Peninsula juts into the Southern Ocean, reaching farther north than any other part of the continent. The southernmost reach of global warming was believed to be limited to this narrow strip of land, while the rest of the continent was presumed to be cooling or stable. Not so, according to a new analysis involving NASA data. In fact, the study has confirmed a trend suspected by some climate scientists. "Everyone knows it has been warming on the Antarctic Peninsula, where there...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related