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Latest Ice sheets Stories

West Antarctica's Ice Sheet 20 Million Years Older Than Previosuly Estimated
2013-09-05 07:26:16

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A research team led by professors at the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) has revealed that, contrary to popular belief, an ice sheet on West Antarctica existed 20 million years earlier than previously thought. These results, published in Geophysical Research Letters, mark a paradigm shift for our understanding of the Earth’s great global ice sheets. Ice sheets first grew on the West Antarctic subcontinent around 34...

Glacial Melt Minimal Effect On Sea Level
2013-08-13 09:47:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Occasionally, melt water on top of a glacier will trickle down to the bedrock below and act as a lubricant for the glacier’s movements. Once thought to be a major contributor to sea-level rise, melt water was found to have only a minor effect on sea level in a new study from a team of European and American scientists. Using computer modeling based on observations of Greenland’s ice sheet, the research team concluded glacier...

Study Explains Surprising Acceleration Of Greenland's Inland Ice
2013-07-24 14:49:30

NASA [ Watch The Video Greenland Ice Flow ] Surface meltwater draining through cracks in an ice sheet can warm the sheet from the inside, softening the ice and letting it flow faster, a new NASA-funded study finds. During the last decade, researchers have captured compelling evidence of accelerating ice flow at terminal regions, or "snouts," of Greenland glaciers as they flow into the ocean along the western coast. Now, the new research shows that the interior regions are also...

Ancient Antarctic Ice Melt 66 Feet
2013-07-22 08:50:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A large team of international researchers has looked millions of years into the Antarctic past and found evidence that massive sections of the continent's eastern ice sheet once melted to raise sea levels by around 66 feet. "Scientists previously considered the East Antarctic ice sheet to be more stable than the much smaller ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland, even though very few studies of East Antarctic ice...

Rising Sea Levels Will Require Adaptation For Generations To Come
2013-07-17 05:46:24

Susan Bowen for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Current levels of greenhouse gas emissions will have far-reaching effects, even if the levels decrease in the near future. According to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the greenhouse gases emitted today will cause the sea level to rise for centuries to come. It is estimated each degree of global warming will raise sea levels by more than two meters. Anders Levermann, lead author of the...

Satellite Data Not Enough Predict Ice Cap Melt
2013-07-15 09:38:00

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a team of European scientists has found there is not enough satellite data to determine the rate of polar ice cap melt very far into the future and warned against using current trends to predict sea level rise that might result from melting glaciers. The ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica represent the biggest potential contributor to sea level rise. According to a study published last year including data from...

Surface Melt Will Continue To Dominate Greenland Ice-Loss
2013-07-10 15:13:45

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to research published in the Journal of Glaciology, surface ice melt will be the dominant process controlling ice-loss from Greenland. Greenland's ice sheet is considered an important potential contributor to future global sea-level rise over the next century or longer. It contains an amount of ice that could lead to a rise of global sea-level by more than 22 feet if it completely melted. Changes in its total mass are caused...

2013-06-13 16:20:31

PASADENA, Calif., June 13, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Ocean waters melting the undersides of Antarctic ice shelves are responsible for most of the continent's ice shelf mass loss, a new study by NASA and university researchers has found. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Scientists have studied the rates of basal melt, or the melting of the ice shelves from underneath, of individual ice shelves, the floating extensions of glaciers that empty into the sea. But...

2013-05-23 11:29:18

Alaska´s melting glaciers remain one of the largest contributors to the world´s rising sea levels, say two University of Alaska Fairbanks geophysicists. UAF Geophysical Institute researchers Anthony Arendt and Regine Hock joined 14 scientists from 10 countries who combined data from field measurements and satellites to get the most complete global picture to date of glacier mass losses and their contribution to rising sea levels. “Sea level change is a pressing societal...

Melting Glaciers Contributing Significantly To Sea Rise
2013-05-17 09:49:29

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have known for some time that melting glaciers are contributing to the global sea-level rise. However, the amount being contributed by each region of the planet has never before been calculated with the accuracy of a new study led by researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Clark University. Ninety-nine percent of Earth´s land ice is locked up in the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets. The study,...