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Latest Iceberg Stories

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2006-10-03 02:45:00

CHICAGO (UPI) -- U.S. scientists say a severe storm in the Gulf of Alaska in October 2005 generated an ocean swell that six days later broke apart a giant iceberg. The team of scientists -- led by Professors Douglas MacAyeal of the University of Chicago and Emile Okal at Northwestern University -- said the swell was so powerful it destroyed the iceberg near the coast of Antarctica, more than 8,300 miles away. "We are reporting on a unique kind of seismological signal picked up by seismometers...

2005-11-24 14:00:00

BERLIN (Reuters) - Scientists monitoring earth movements in Antarctica believe they have found a singing iceberg. Sound waves from the iceberg had a frequency of around 0.5 hertz, too low to be heard by humans, but by playing them at higher speed the iceberg sounded like a swarm of bees or an orchestra warming up, the scientists said. The German Alfred Wegener institute for polar and marine research publish the results of its study, done in 2002, in Science magazine on Friday. Between July...

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2005-11-07 17:44:15

ESA -- After five years of being the world's largest free-floating object, the B-15A iceberg has broken into smaller pieces off Antarctica's Cape Adare. ESA's Envisat satellite's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) is sensitive to ice, and has been tracking the movement of the drifting ice object continuously since the beginning of this year. Its latest imagery reveals the bottle-shaped iceberg split into nine knife-shaped icebergs and a myriad of smaller pieces on 27-28 October,...

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2005-06-13 23:25:00

A multifaceted research effort by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and their international colleagues from the University of Tasmania and the Australian Antarctic Division, has resulted in several important new findings about Antarctica and the changing dynamics of its ice structure. Scientists have been investigating the mechanisms by which Antarctic icebergs detach from the main continental ice sheet because of the importance of...

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2005-05-17 12:10:00

ESA -- The mammoth B-15A iceberg appears poised to strike another floating Antarctic ice feature, a month on from a passing blow that broke off the end of the Drygalski ice tongue. As this Envisat image reveals, this time its target is the ice tongue of the Aviator Glacier. First discovered in 1955, and named to mark the work done by airmen to open up the Antarctic continent, the Aviator Glacier is a major valley glacier descending from the plateau of Victoria Land along the west side of...

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2005-04-19 10:40:22

ESA -- Maps of Antarctica need to be amended. The long-awaited collision between the vast B-15A iceberg and the landfast Drygalski ice tongue has taken place. This Envisat radar image shows the ice tongue "“ large and permanent enough to feature in Antarctic atlases - has come off worst. An image acquired by Envisat on 15 April 2005 shows that a five-kilometre-long section at the seaward end of Drygalski has broken off following a collision with the drifting B-15A. The iceberg itself...

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2005-04-01 07:15:49

CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AFP) -- The threat of sea access being blocked to US and New Zealand bases in Antarctica may have receded after the world's largest iceberg broke free from the McMurdo Sound sea bed last month, New Zealand Antarctic officials said. Iceberg B-15A -- equivalent in size to Luxembourg -- has started moving again into deeper water after becoming stuck in relatively shallow seas in January. The previous position of the iceberg had caused a build up of sea ice in McMurdo...

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2005-03-19 09:20:00

ESA -- Envisat radar imagery confirms that the B-15A iceberg "“ the world's largest floating object "“ is adrift once more after two months aground on a shallow seamount. This latest development poses a renewed threat to the nearby pier of land-attached ice known as the Drygalski ice tongue. The sheer scale of B-15A is best appreciated from space. The bottle-shaped Antarctic iceberg is around 120 kilometres long, with an area exceeding 2500 square kilometres, making it about...

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2005-03-07 10:25:00

ESA -- Three of the world's largest and fastest yachts are in the midst of a non-stop trans-global race, hurtling in excess of 25 knots - 46 kilometres per hour - through the Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica. Iceberg collision is a real risk, but ice-sensitive radar satellites are monitoring the area to provide advance warning to crews. "It has been a huge tactical "“ and psychological - advantage to planning our track through the Southern Ocean," says navigator Will Oxley...

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2005-01-20 07:02:58

NASA -- Car demolition derbies last minutes, but when it comes to a giant iceberg near Antarctica it takes a bit longer. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra and Aqua satellites captured images of iceberg B-15A steaming a steady course towards the extended Drygalski Ice Tongue and scientists expected the Long Island, NY sized berg to initiate a colossal collision by January 15. Instead B15A appears to have grounded on a submarine shoal when it was just...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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