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Latest Ichthyology Stories

2012-03-06 23:42:52

Implications for communities developing wastewater reuse facilities and risks to aquatic life Fish exhibit abnormal behavior and lower levels of anxiety when exposed to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI), which are common drugs used to treat depression, among other disorders. The study, by Baylor University researchers and online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, also found that human data for drug activity can be used to predict surface water...

2012-03-05 10:45:14

Shark fins are worth more than other parts of the shark and are often removed from the body, which gets thrown back into the sea. To curtail this wasteful practice, many countries allow the fins to be landed detached from shark bodies, as long as their weight does not exceed five per cent of the total shark catch. New University of British Columbia research shows that this kind of legislation is too liberal. A study published this week in the journal Fish Biology analyzes the fin to body...

Image 1 - Shark's 'Denticles' Help It Achieve Higher Speeds
2012-02-09 13:47:34

Researchers have found that razor sharp tooth-like scales known as denticles found in a shark's skin actually help the fish swim faster. The denticles are thought of to behave like the dimples on a golf ball, disturbing the flow of water over the surface to help reduce the drag and increase the thrust. "What we found is that as the shark skin membrane moves, there is a separation of flow — the denticles create a low-pressure zone, called a leading-edge vortex, as the water moves...

2012-01-26 13:30:57

University of Massachusetts Amherst fish biologists have published one of the first studies of deep-sea fish sounds in more than 50 years, collected from the sea floor about 2,237 feet (682 meters) below the North Atlantic. With recording technology now more affordable, Rodney Rountree, Francis Juanes and colleagues are exploring the idea that many fish make sounds to communicate with each other, especially those that live in the perpetual dark of the deep ocean. Though little is known at...

2012-01-05 16:39:24

In 1997, scientists at the Center for Neurodynamics at the University of Missouri - St. Louis demonstrated that special sensors covering the elongated snout of paddlefish are electroreceptors that help the fish detect prey by responding to the weak voltage gradients that swimming zooplankton create in the surrounding water. Now some of the same researchers have found that the electroreceptors contain oscillators, which generate rhythmical firing of electrosensory neurons. The oscillators...

Novel Study Sheds Light On Early Life Of Prolific Predator
2011-12-17 04:46:16

University of Miami team sinks teeth into larval life of barracuda, sennets For anglers and boaters who regularly travel the coasts of Florida the great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) is a common sight. Surprisingly, however, very little is known about the early life stage of this ecologically and socio-economically important coastal fish. In the journal Marine Biology, lead author Dr. Evan D'Alessandro and University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science...

2011-12-16 14:13:45

The majority can benefit when individuals are uninformed From shoals of fish to human society: social organisms need to make collective decisions. And it is not always the majority that prevails. In some cases, a small, resolute group may succeed in bending the whole community to their will. Using computer models and behavioral studies of fish, a team of scientists, including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, has discovered that...

2011-12-15 16:33:08

An international team of researchers studying sound production in perch-like fishes has discovered a link between two unrelated lineages of fishes, taking researchers a step closer to understanding the evolution of one of the fastest muscles in vertebrates. Understanding the evolution of such fast muscles has been difficult for researchers because slow movement of a swimbladder does not generate sound. In a study published online Nov. 29 in the journal Frontiers in Zoology, Virginia...

2011-12-14 19:47:11

Study focuses on oxygen minimum zones in NE Atlantic and effects on pelagic species The science behind counting fish in the ocean to measure their abundance has never been simple. A new scientific paper in Nature Climate Change shows that expanding 'ocean dead zones' (areas of low oxygen) driven in part by climate change makes that science even more complex. Blue marlin, other billfish and tropical tuna are high energy fish that need large amounts of dissolved oxygen. Scientists from...


Latest Ichthyology Reference Libraries

Prowfish
2014-05-30 12:05:29

The prowfish (Zaprora silenus) is a subtropical species of a perch-like fish found in the northern Pacific Ocean. The range of the prowfish is from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska to Kamchatka, Russia, from Navarin Canyon in the Bering Sea to Hokkaido, Japan and Monterey, California. The preferred habitat of the prowish is rocky bottom at a maximum of 2,200 feet in depth where they spend most of their adult life. Prowfish can grow to a length of 40 inches or more having an elongated body that...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Ichthyology
2013-10-02 13:31:45

Ichthyology is the study of fish that focuses on many types of fish including cartilaginous fish, jawless fish, and skeletal fish. This branch of zoology can be associated with marine biology and fisheries science, as well as other areas of study. Ichthyologists, those who practice ichthyology, have discovered more than 32,200 species of fish, and it is thought that they discover 250 new species each year. Humans first began to study fish during the Upper Paleolithic Revolution, when humans...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

African Sharptooth Catfish, Clarias gariepinus
2013-02-09 08:30:28

Image Credit: WA Djatmiko/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) The African sharptooth catfish is native throughout Africa, and the Middle East, and in the 1980’s it was introduced all over the world. This catfish lives on muddy bottoms in freshwater lakes, rivers, swamps, man-made habitats, and occasionally found in urban sewage systems. This species is able to crawl across dry ground to another body of water when one pool dries up. It is also able to survive for long periods of...

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Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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