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Latest Ichthyology Stories

2010-09-16 18:16:13

When fish or tiny, shrimp-like krill get together, it appears they follow the same set of "rules." According to a new study published online on September 16th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, shoals of fish and swarms of krill hang out in groups that take on the same overall shape; it's not a simple sphere, a cylinder, or ovoid, but something more akin to an irregular crystal, the researchers say. "The fact that several species of fish and krill that live in very different...

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2010-09-10 08:33:53

We're all familiar with birds that are as comfortable diving as they are flying but only one family of fish has made the reverse journey. Flying fish can remain airborne for over 40s, covering distances of up to 400m at speeds of 70km/h. Haecheon Choi, a mechanical engineer from Seoul National University, Korea, became fascinated by flying fish when reading a science book to his children. Realising that flying fish really do fly, he and his colleague, Hyungmin Park, decided to find out how...

2010-08-30 10:47:00

Ocean Conservation Organization invites Public to its Fun-Raiser LONG BEACH, Calif., Aug. 30 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Non-profit organization Iemanya Oceanica (pronounced ya-MON-ja) announces the GREAT SHARK Affaire, a festival, to be held at the Long Beach Rainbow Lagoon, October 2-3, 2010. This charitable event will teach about ocean conservation as well as protecting sharks and their habitats. The GREAT SHARK Affaire(TM) will be set in a festival-like atmosphere teaching how every...

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2010-08-25 11:05:00

How do female whale sharks meet their perfect mates and go on to produce offspring? While little is known about the reproductive behavior of these ocean-roaming giants, a newly published analysis led by University of Illinois at Chicago biologist Jennifer Schmidt reveals new details about the mating habits of this elusive, difficult-to-study fish. Schmidt, a UIC associate professor of biological sciences, determined paternity of 29 frozen embryos saved from a female whale shark caught off the...

2010-08-04 16:24:44

Whether a fish likes to hunt down its food or wait for dinner to arrive is linked to the composition of its brain, a University of Guelph researcher has revealed. Prof. Rob McLaughlin has discovered that foraging behaviour of brook trout is related to the size of a particular region in the fish's brain. "We found that the fish that swim around in the open in search of food have larger telencephalons than the fish that sit along the shoreline and wait for food to swim by in the water column,"...

2010-07-02 00:41:24

New observations indicate that liparids dominate the deep A study of the occurrence of fishes in the ocean's deepest reaches"”the hadal zone, below 6000 meters"”has provided evidence that some species of fishes are more numerous at such depths than experts had thought. The authors of the study, which is published in the July/August issue of BioScience, observed 10 to 20 snailfish congregating at a depth of 7703 meters around a baited video lander in the Japan Trench. The...

2010-06-23 01:34:18

The limited immune response in the eyes of freshwater fishes has created a great home for parasites, according to research published online in the journal Molecular Ecology. The study provides a lens into the evolutionary world of the larval flukes that parasitize Canadian fish. "Canada probably has the best studied freshwater fish parasites in the world, so we were amazed when we found four times more species of flukes in a few fishes from the St. Lawrence than were previously known in all...

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2010-06-11 07:11:19

It's no secret that sharks have a keen sense of smell and a remarkable ability to follow their noses through the ocean, right to their next meal. Now, researchers reporting online in the June 10th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, have figured out how the sharks manage to keep themselves on course. It turns out that sharks can detect small delays, no more than half a second long, in the time that odors reach one nostril versus the other, the researchers report. When the...

2010-06-04 13:38:16

Going more miles per gallon with your brain The hunting strategy of a slender fish from the Amazon is giving researchers more insight into how to balance the metabolic cost of information with the metabolic cost of moving around to get that information. A new study from Northwestern University's McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science answers the question: In behaviors in which you have to move to get information, when should the animal spend more energy on locomotion versus...

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2010-06-01 12:59:59

Scientists say that fish are being threatened by man-made noise pollution. The scientists reviewed the impact of noise made by oil and gas rigs, ships, boats and sonar on fish species around the world. They say that rather than live in a silent world, most fish hear well and sound plays an active part in their lives. The increasing noise pollution may severely affect the distribution of fish, as well as their ability to reproduce, communicate and avoid predators. "People always just...


Latest Ichthyology Reference Libraries

Prowfish
2014-05-30 12:05:29

The prowfish (Zaprora silenus) is a subtropical species of a perch-like fish found in the northern Pacific Ocean. The range of the prowfish is from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska to Kamchatka, Russia, from Navarin Canyon in the Bering Sea to Hokkaido, Japan and Monterey, California. The preferred habitat of the prowish is rocky bottom at a maximum of 2,200 feet in depth where they spend most of their adult life. Prowfish can grow to a length of 40 inches or more having an elongated body that...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Ichthyology
2013-10-02 13:31:45

Ichthyology is the study of fish that focuses on many types of fish including cartilaginous fish, jawless fish, and skeletal fish. This branch of zoology can be associated with marine biology and fisheries science, as well as other areas of study. Ichthyologists, those who practice ichthyology, have discovered more than 32,200 species of fish, and it is thought that they discover 250 new species each year. Humans first began to study fish during the Upper Paleolithic Revolution, when humans...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

African Sharptooth Catfish, Clarias gariepinus
2013-02-09 08:30:28

Image Credit: WA Djatmiko/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) The African sharptooth catfish is native throughout Africa, and the Middle East, and in the 1980’s it was introduced all over the world. This catfish lives on muddy bottoms in freshwater lakes, rivers, swamps, man-made habitats, and occasionally found in urban sewage systems. This species is able to crawl across dry ground to another body of water when one pool dries up. It is also able to survive for long periods of...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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