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Latest Ichthyology Stories

Thinking 'Big' May Not Be The Best Way To Save Large-river Fish
2013-05-23 13:57:04

University of Wisconsin-Madison Large-river specialist fishes – from giant species like paddlefish and blue catfish, to tiny crystal darters and silver chub – are in danger, but researchers say there is greater hope to save them if major tributaries identified in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study become a focus of conservation efforts. The study says 60 out of 68 U.S. species, or 88 percent of fish species found exclusively in large-river ecosystems like the...

Evolution Of Hips Simpler Than Suspected
2013-05-15 12:04:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The evolutionary path from the bone structure of the fish to the complex, weight-bearing hips of walking animals was a much simpler process than previously thought, according to a new study. About 395 million years ago, the first tetrapods, or four-legged animals, stepped onto land. This transition was accomplished using strong, weight-bearing hipbones and a connection through the spine via the ilium. These features were not present...

New Species Of Bass Discovered In Florida
2013-05-08 14:15:09

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists in Florida recently announced that they have discovered a new species of black bass in the southeastern United States. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) researchers say they discovered the newly christened "Choctaw bass" during a genetic study of bass in 2007. Scientists discovered a DNA profile that did not belong to any species while testing other bass species in the Chipola River in 2007....

Unborn Sand Tiger Sharks Cannibalize One Another To Become Sole Survivor
2013-05-01 15:25:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In some sexually reproducing species, the competition between males to pass on their genetic material ends with conception. However, for sand tiger sharks that competition extends into the female´s uteri where baby sharks cannibalize one another until only one remains. According to a new study in Biology Letters, a female sand tiger shark typically mates with multiple males, but the results of in utero cannibalism could result in...

Jumping Guppy Inspires Researcher To Look Further For Clues
2013-04-26 05:39:11

[ Watch the Video: Guppy Jumping High Speed Video ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As anyone who has ever owned a pet guppy knows, guppies will often jump out of their tanks. Parents have been stumped for answers when children ask why the fish would do such a thing. A new University of Maryland (UMD) study demonstrates how guppies are able to jump so high, and suggests an answer for why they do it. Biologist Daphne De Freitas Soares is an expert in the brain...

Research Shows Great White Sharks Enjoy Their Hawaiian Vacations
2013-04-19 19:41:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online New research in the Journal of Marine Biology revealed previously unknown details about Great White sharks that roam the waters surrounding Hawaii. "This study is valuable in that it provides a better understanding of the biology and behavior of white sharks, which is very useful for management purposes,” said co-author William Aila, chairperson of the State of Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources....

2013-04-19 19:20:47

Fishes account for over half of vertebrate species, but while groups such as mammals, birds and reptiles have been fairly well understood by scientists for decades, knowledge about relationships among many types of fishes was essentially unknown — until now. A team of scientists led by Richard Broughton, associate professor of biology at the University of Oklahoma, published two studies that dramatically increase understanding of fish evolution and their relationships. They...

Effects Of Changing Ocean pH May Result In Increase In The Hearing Sensitivity Of Fish
2013-04-19 14:26:57

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Ocean acidification, which occurs as CO2 is absorbed by the world's oceans, is known to negatively impact a wide variety of marine animals ranging from massive corals to microscopic plankton. However, there is much less information about how fish may be impacted by acidification, should carbon emissions continue to rise as a result of human activities. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National...

New Insight Into Evolution Offered From Unusual Anal Fin
2013-04-10 09:31:33

University of Manchester An unusual fossil fish that has fins behind its anus could have implications for human evolution according to a scientist at The University of Manchester. Dr Robert Sansom from the Faculty of Life Sciences identified the paired fins of Euphanerops, a fossil jawless fish that swam in the seas around 370 million years ago. The find makes the fish one of the first vertebrate to develop paired appendages such as fins, legs or arms. However, their positioning is...

Ocellated Ice Fish In Japanese Aquarium Has Clear Blood
2013-04-07 07:03:28

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An unusual species of fish caught in the Antarctic Ocean two years ago has no scales and completely transparent blood, according to experts at Japan´s Tokyo Sea Life Park. The aquarium is the only place in the world that currently has the unusual creature, which is known as the Ocellated Ice Fish, in captivity. Researchers there say that the fish has clear blood because of it lacks hemoglobin — the protein which gives...


Latest Ichthyology Reference Libraries

Prowfish
2014-05-30 12:05:29

The prowfish (Zaprora silenus) is a subtropical species of a perch-like fish found in the northern Pacific Ocean. The range of the prowfish is from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska to Kamchatka, Russia, from Navarin Canyon in the Bering Sea to Hokkaido, Japan and Monterey, California. The preferred habitat of the prowish is rocky bottom at a maximum of 2,200 feet in depth where they spend most of their adult life. Prowfish can grow to a length of 40 inches or more having an elongated body that...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Ichthyology
2013-10-02 13:31:45

Ichthyology is the study of fish that focuses on many types of fish including cartilaginous fish, jawless fish, and skeletal fish. This branch of zoology can be associated with marine biology and fisheries science, as well as other areas of study. Ichthyologists, those who practice ichthyology, have discovered more than 32,200 species of fish, and it is thought that they discover 250 new species each year. Humans first began to study fish during the Upper Paleolithic Revolution, when humans...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

African Sharptooth Catfish, Clarias gariepinus
2013-02-09 08:30:28

Image Credit: WA Djatmiko/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) The African sharptooth catfish is native throughout Africa, and the Middle East, and in the 1980’s it was introduced all over the world. This catfish lives on muddy bottoms in freshwater lakes, rivers, swamps, man-made habitats, and occasionally found in urban sewage systems. This species is able to crawl across dry ground to another body of water when one pool dries up. It is also able to survive for long periods of...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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