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Latest Ichthyology Stories

Sea Lampreys Use Fat Layer To Attract Females
2013-06-27 18:33:19

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Male sea lampreys, often called vampire fish, have a long ridge running across their backs that contains a long row of brown fat cells. Other animals also have stores of brown fat similar to the ridge found on the male lampreys. In mammals, this fat is used to regulate body temperature and warm the animal when their surroundings are too cold. Scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) were curious why the male lampreys had this...

Body Undulations Of Fish And Eels
2013-06-24 15:47:54

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Looking to biology for inspiration seems to be all the rage in engineering circles these days, and a team of Northwestern University and NYU scientists has discovered new insights into how undulations help a fish to swim. The team’s findings, which were published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology, could have implications for the development of new underwater vehicles. “If we could play God and create an undulatory...

2013-06-13 12:38:47

Weakly electric fish spend their lives bathed in their own internally generated mild electric field, interpreting perturbations in the field as objects pass through and when communicating with members of their own species through high frequency electric 'chirps'. Rüdiger Krahe, from McGill University, Canada, says, 'These fish are very cryptic and hard for us to understand because we don't have this electric sense'. Electric fish actively produce their weak electric fields;...

Remora Sucking Disc Actually Modified Dorsal Fin
2013-06-07 13:51:02

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Remora fish have fascinated men since ancient times, when they would use the sucking disc on top of their heads to attach themselves to the hulls of boats. Our ancestors mistakenly believed the fish´s intent was to maliciously slow the boat down. Our knowledge of these strange-looking fish has come a long way, as scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and London's Natural History Museum have just reported that the...

2013-06-07 13:07:10

Many animals are able to discriminate between related and unrelated individuals but how they do so has proven remarkably difficult to understand. Joachim Frommen and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have investigated the issue using the three-spined stickleback and its shoaling preferences as a model system. It turns out that the fish prefer kin to unrelated conspecifics, regardless of how familiar they are with individual shoal members. The results indicate that...

2013-06-06 11:49:18

Efforts to restore sturgeon in the Great Lakes region have received a lot of attention in recent years, and many of the news stories note that the prehistoric-looking fish are "living fossils" virtually unchanged for millions of years. But a new study by University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues reveals that in at least one measure of evolutionary change–changes in body size over time–sturgeon have been one of the fastest-evolving fish on the planet. "Sturgeon...

Thinking 'Big' May Not Be The Best Way To Save Large-river Fish
2013-05-23 13:57:04

University of Wisconsin-Madison Large-river specialist fishes – from giant species like paddlefish and blue catfish, to tiny crystal darters and silver chub – are in danger, but researchers say there is greater hope to save them if major tributaries identified in a University of Wisconsin-Madison study become a focus of conservation efforts. The study says 60 out of 68 U.S. species, or 88 percent of fish species found exclusively in large-river ecosystems like the...

Evolution Of Hips Simpler Than Suspected
2013-05-15 12:04:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The evolutionary path from the bone structure of the fish to the complex, weight-bearing hips of walking animals was a much simpler process than previously thought, according to a new study. About 395 million years ago, the first tetrapods, or four-legged animals, stepped onto land. This transition was accomplished using strong, weight-bearing hipbones and a connection through the spine via the ilium. These features were not present...

New Species Of Bass Discovered In Florida
2013-05-08 14:15:09

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists in Florida recently announced that they have discovered a new species of black bass in the southeastern United States. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) researchers say they discovered the newly christened "Choctaw bass" during a genetic study of bass in 2007. Scientists discovered a DNA profile that did not belong to any species while testing other bass species in the Chipola River in 2007....

Unborn Sand Tiger Sharks Cannibalize One Another To Become Sole Survivor
2013-05-01 15:25:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In some sexually reproducing species, the competition between males to pass on their genetic material ends with conception. However, for sand tiger sharks that competition extends into the female´s uteri where baby sharks cannibalize one another until only one remains. According to a new study in Biology Letters, a female sand tiger shark typically mates with multiple males, but the results of in utero cannibalism could result in...


Latest Ichthyology Reference Libraries

Prowfish
2014-05-30 12:05:29

The prowfish (Zaprora silenus) is a subtropical species of a perch-like fish found in the northern Pacific Ocean. The range of the prowfish is from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska to Kamchatka, Russia, from Navarin Canyon in the Bering Sea to Hokkaido, Japan and Monterey, California. The preferred habitat of the prowish is rocky bottom at a maximum of 2,200 feet in depth where they spend most of their adult life. Prowfish can grow to a length of 40 inches or more having an elongated body that...

Bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix
2013-10-22 10:54:52

The Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only living species of the family Pomatomidae. It is a marine pelagic fish that can be found around the world in temperate and subtropical waters, except for the northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, and elf on the west coast. Other common names regarding this fish are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is a good eating and game fish. The bluefish is moderately proportioned with a...

Ichthyology
2013-10-02 13:31:45

Ichthyology is the study of fish that focuses on many types of fish including cartilaginous fish, jawless fish, and skeletal fish. This branch of zoology can be associated with marine biology and fisheries science, as well as other areas of study. Ichthyologists, those who practice ichthyology, have discovered more than 32,200 species of fish, and it is thought that they discover 250 new species each year. Humans first began to study fish during the Upper Paleolithic Revolution, when humans...

Little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus
2013-03-28 14:07:39

The little tunny is found widespread in temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. It is the most common tuna and is highly migratory, with a range from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Brazil in the Western Atlantic. In the Eastern Atlantic it is found from Skagerrak to South Africa. The little tunny will form schools close to the shoreline, around inlets, and sandbars that can cover up to two miles. This fish prefers warm water and will migrate south in...

African Sharptooth Catfish, Clarias gariepinus
2013-02-09 08:30:28

Image Credit: WA Djatmiko/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.0) The African sharptooth catfish is native throughout Africa, and the Middle East, and in the 1980’s it was introduced all over the world. This catfish lives on muddy bottoms in freshwater lakes, rivers, swamps, man-made habitats, and occasionally found in urban sewage systems. This species is able to crawl across dry ground to another body of water when one pool dries up. It is also able to survive for long periods of...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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